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Celebs were out and about this week — from Margot Robbie celebrating the opening night of Refinery29’s 29 Rooms, to Snoop Dogg getting into the holiday spirit, to Cardi B putting on a stellar performance. Read on to see more of what the stars have been up to! — Rosie Huntington-Whitely and Olivia Palermo attended […]

Riverdale’s midseason finale was not playing around. The Wednesday, December 13, episode finally revealed who The Black Hood was, and a life was lost as a consequence. But is he really the black hood? And what does it mean for the gang? Here’s our breakdown of “Chapter Twenty-Two: Silent Night, Deadly Night.” Decoy Christmastime in […]

Peter Sarsgaard’s holiday presents for his kids are always one of a kind. “They have to be made,” he told Us Weekly exclusively at the New York City premiere of Wormwood on Tuesday, December 12, of handcrafting gifts for Ramona, 11, and Gloria, 5. “The presents have to be made for little people.” Some things that are homemade for […]

Scheana Marie and Robert Valletta are still friends … but not with benefits. The Vanderpump Rules star spoke to Us Weekly exclusively about her relationship with her ex at the premiere of Pitch Perfect 3 at Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. “You’ll see a lot of me with Rob on the show, probably not a lot […]

We scoured Amazon to curate the gifts that will delight every beautylover on your list. No matter your budget, consider your holiday shopping sorted!

‘Tis the season to eat, drink and be merry! Iron chef Geoffrey Zakarian invited Us Weekly into his state-of-the-art restaurant The Lambs Club on the Upper West side of New York City to teach Us how to make a seasonal version of a Moscow Mule. Watch the video to see how he makes a “Merry […]

It’s a Kardashian Kristmas! As the most wonderful time of the year nears, the Kardashian clan is preparing to release their latest holiday card. The famous family is known for their glitzy end-of-the year cards, and they have taken to social media during the past few days to tease the latest installment. Fans have speculated […]

Cyndi Lauper is once again making a splash — the iconic singer has designed and launched a new clothing line with HSN. Lauper caught up with Us about her newest passion project, explaining that she “designed clothes for the woman who wants to wear couture,” but wasn’t able to before because it wasn’t in her size […]

The drama is heating up in the OC. Meghan King Edmonds has officially responded after her Real Housewives of Orange County costar Vicki Gunvalson told Us Weekly that she doesn’t know why Edmonds is a part of the hit Bravo reality show. “She’s so desperate,” Edmonds, 33, told Us Weekly exclusively on Wednesday, December 13. […]

ASOS x Star Wars collection is a unique twist on casualwear bringing that intergalactic magic touch to your closet right here on earth. Scroll through to see the women’s collection, including Rey-worthy dresses and cute droid-printed tees. By clicking on a link to a product or brand listed on our website, we may receive compensation […]

Feeling the love! Selena Gomez, Ryan Seacrest and more stars took to social media on Wednesday, December 13, to wish Taylor Swift a happy 28th birthday. I’m glad you were born. You write all the thoughts some aren’t able to articulate. (ME!) Thank you for giving a voice to this world that is authentic and […]

Kanye West vs. Wiz Khalifa, Donald Trump vs. Megyn Kelly, George Clooney vs. Russell Crowe and many more: Take a look back at some of Hollywood’s ugliest feuds of all time!

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Taking the high road. Tiffany Haddish is thanking everyone for their support — especially her friend and costar Jada Pinkett Smith — after the comedian didn’t receive a Golden Globes nomination for her breakout role in “Thank all of y’all for your love and support,” Haddish, 38, wrote on Twitter on Wednesday, December 13, to […]

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Functional winter staples don’t have to be boring and Bella Hadid is the proof! The supermodel stepped out in NYC on Monday, December 11, wearing Louis Vuitton Platform Laureate Desert boots — essentially your classic winter boot with some majorly luxe upgrades. The exact boot that Bella rocked may be sold out, but Style found […]

Chris Soules has been granted permission to travel ahead of a January trial date in his fatal car accident case, Us Weekly confirms. The Iowa Judicial Branch tells Us that the Bachelor alum, 36, applied to modify the conditions of his pretrial release to allow him to travel from Iowa to Wannetka, Illinois, between December […]

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When you see a picture of celebrity mom who looks like she has it all together, Eva Amurri Martino wants you to remember this: Famous people get pooped on too. “At the end of the day, we’re still getting puked on and pooped on,” the 35-year-old actress told Us Weekly. “I have to have makeup […]

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Timeline of Philadelphia History

  • First church built by the Swedes consecrated on Tinicum Island.
  • March 4. Charter of Pennsylvania granted by Charles II.
  • August 12. William Penn left Philadelphia, and returned to England.
  • Quaker meeting House built, S. W. Corner Second and High (Market) Streets, which was pulled down in 1755, and another erected, which was demolished in 1808.
  • First school book published in America by Francis Pastorius.
  • July 2. New Swedes Church consecrated on the on the ground formerly occupied by the Swedes Church, Southwark.
  • December 2. William Penn arrived at Philadelphia.
  • First Presbyterian Church built, High Street and White Horse Alley (Market and Bank Streets).
  • A club was formed called the Bachelors' Club, situate on the Delaware shore above Gunners' Run. This was the first country club adjacent to the city. "Bachelors' Hall," as it was commonly called, was made notorious by its festivities.
  • October. Benjamin Franklin arrived in Philadelphia and applied to Andrew Bradford, the printer, for employment. Employed as a printer until he and his friend James Ralph, a merchant's clerk, in 1724 sailed together to London to "seek their fortunes." Franklin returned to Philadelphia October 11, 1726. In the winter of 1726-27, he found the Junto.
  • March 1. St. David's Day. Welsh citizens organize the "Society of Ancient Britons" at the Queen's Head Tavern in King Street (now Water Street.) Attend service in Christ Church, sermon preached in the original Cymric.
  • A fishing club was instituted under the title of "Colony of Schuylkill." This club, which is yet in existence on the Delaware, at Andalusia, is now known as the State in Schuylkill.
  • September 22. Arrival of the English ship St. Andrew with the first contingent of emigrants, followers of Caspar Schwenkfeld, a repressed sect in Silesia and Germany. On the next day (September 23d) all male persons over the age of sixteen years proceeded to the State House, and there subscribed a pledge of allegiance to George 2, King of Great Britain, and his successors. They spent the 24th in thanksgiving to Almighty God for delivering them out of the hands of their persecutors, for raising up friends in the times of their greatest need, and for leading them into a land of freedom where they might worship Him unmolested by civil or ecclesiastical power. To this day the 24th of September is so observed by this sect. The emigrants settled in Montgomery, Berks and Lehigh Counties.
  • First German Church built in Race Street Below Fourth. St. Michael's German Lutheran Church, corner of Fifth and Appletree Alley, built.
  • April 15. The first theatrical performance given in Philadelphia, in a storehouse, Water Street, near Vine.
  • Lottery schemes proposed and ran riot. Lottery held for disposing of 46 acres of land on Petty's Land on Petty's Island, the property of Alexander Alexander. Other projects were for the paving of streets in Philadelphia, and for the benefit of various churches.
  • May. District of Southwark created. Boundary, Delaware River, Cedar Street (South); thence west to the Passyunk Road, to the Moyamensing Road, by Keeler's Lane to the Greenwich Road to Delaware River
  • November. Organization of the first medical college in Pennsylvania, by Dr. William Shippen, Jr. Located on Fourth Street, below Arch.
  • September 5. Provincial Congress met at Carpenters' Hall.
  • Continental Congress in session at Philadelphia elects Benjamin Franklin (Printer) first Postmaster General of the United Colonies. (A Pony Express was established. In summer the mail left New York for Philadelphia twice a week and vice versa. In winter if mail came within two weeks, was considered good. Franklin, with his keen appreciation of all the advance of science, doubtless would be lost in admiration of those winged couriers of the skies who daily traverse the aerial paths from the Hudson to the Golden Gate and who now span the Continent in less time than it took in his day to transmit a letter from Boston to the Potomac.)
  • September 26. The British entered Philadelphia.
  • October 15. Battle of Germantown.
  • October 22. Battle of Red Bank.
  • November 15. Mud Fort evacuated, and taken by the British.
  • May 26. Act of Congress passed, authorizing the establishment of the Bank of North America. The bank opened January, 1783.
  • January 14. Definitive treaty of peace with England ratified by Congress. Triumphal arch erected at "the upper end of High Street," then between Sixth and Seventh Streets.
  • August 22. Steamboat forty-five feet long navigated on the Delaware River by John Fitch.
  • March 11. Act to incorporate the city of Philadelphia passed by the Legislature.
  • October 12. David Cronan, Francis Burns, John Burnett, John Logan and John Ferguson hung at Centre Square for the murder of John McFarland.
  • First election of President of the United States.
  • April 17. (Saturday evening.) Death of Benjamin Franklin. Buried in Christ Church cemetery, southeast corner of Fifth and Arch St. In keeping with his wishes, the epitaph Franklin composed was not carved on his tombstone. The autograph "copy" of the epitaph in the Library of Congress is dated 1784 and reads: The body

(Like the cover of an old Book

And stripped of its lettering and gilding)

But the work shall not be lost,

In a new and More elegant Edition

By the Author.

December 6. Congress moves from New York to Philadelphia, meeting at Congress Hall. As the home of Congress, Philadelphia was the capital of the nation, and would remain so until 1800.
  • April 2. Act passed establishing United States Mint in Philadelphia. Mint erected on the east side of Seventh Street, above Sugar Alley (afterward known as Farmer Street, now Filbert Street).
  • First Universalist Church built in Lombard Street, above Fourth.
  • March 23. The Assembly passed an act to extend the market house on High Street (Market) from Third to Fourth Street, and to extend it as occasion required, from street to street westward.
  • Yellow Fever. Deaths in August-November: 4,002.
  • The Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike, the first in the United States, opened.
  • April. Ordinance passed compelling the owners and occupants of houses in the city in the city to provide and keep in repair any number of leathern buckets not exceeding six for each building, to be used in extinguishing fires.
  • Yellow Fever. Deaths, August-November, 3,637.
  • March. An act was passed by the Legislature chartering "The Germantown and Reading Turnpike Road," said turnpike to commence at the intersection of Front Street with the Germantown Road, thence through Germantown to the top of Chestnut Hill and thence through Hickorytown, the Trappe, and Pottstown to Reading.
  • August 18. Arrival of General Thaddeus Kosciusko, the Polish Patriot. Received by a large gathering of citizens.
  • September 2. Bank of Pennsylvania entered at night and robbed of $162,821.61. Other banks becoming alarmed, transferred to Germantown. The streets at night being deserted due to the prevailing fever.
  • May 2. Work upon the Schuylkill Water Works, at Chestnut Street wharf and Centre Square commenced. First water thrown into the city January 21, 1801.
  • December 26. National Funeral Procession for George Washington (who had died at Mount Vernon on December 14). Thousands of mourners process from Congress Hall to the New (Zion) Lutheran Church, where Maj. Gen. Henry Lee eulogizes the former president as "First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen."
  • March 7. The town of Frankford incorporated as a borough.
  • Yellow Fever. Deaths, August-November, 1,015.
  • Schuylkill Arsenal, near Gray's Ferry, built.
  • United States Navy Yard (foot of Federal Street, Delaware River) established.
  • February 12. Incorporation of the Germantown and Perkiomen Turnpike Company. The road to begin at the corner of Third and Vine Streets.
  • District of Northern Liberties incorporated.
  • March 24. The Cheltenham and Willow Grove Turnpike Company incorporated. Their route was "from the Rising Sun Tavern through Shoemakertown (Ogontz) to the Red Lion Inn (Willow Grove), on the Old York Road."
  • On the same day another company was incorporated to build a turnpike "from Front Street through Frankford and Bustleton to the Morrisville Ferry, Bucks County."
  • Manufacturing enterprises continued to be established. The largest of the year was the Seth Craige cotton mill (later the old Globe Mill), bordering on the Cohocksink Creek, Germantown Ave. Below Franklin Ave. (Girard Ave.). This formally was "the Governor's grist mill." This cotton mill became later on an extensive concern, manufacturing cotton and woolen fabrics.
  • Race course established in the Northern Liberties, on the Old York Road at the corner of Nicetown Lane. Afterwards known as Hunting Park. Later on Purchased by some public spirited citizens and presented to the city for a public park.
  • The first steam ferry boat used to convey passengers from Philadelphia to Camden. "Camden" Captain Zeiba Kellam. Course, lower side of Market Street to Cooper Street.
  • March 22. District of Spring Garden incorporated.
  • February 13. New received of the signing of a treaty of peace with England. Grand illumination in the evening. Grand Ball given at Vauxhall Garden, northeast, corner of Broad and Walnut Streets. A grand Te Deum, in honor of the event, sung at St. Augustine's Church on February 26th.
  • December 29. Launching of the new steamboat Baltimore at the shipyard of Vaughn & Bowers, Kensington.
  • In November, 1815, the county Commissioners proposed a plan of education to the City Councils, which led, in January, 1816, to the appointment of a committee to consult with the commissioners of Southwark and of the Northern Liberties. But it was not until 1818 that the details were sanctioned by the Legislature, when an act was passed providing for the education of poor children at the public expense in the city and county of Philadelphia, forming the "first School District of Pennsylvania." The School Controllers established two schools in Southwark, two in Moyamensing, two in Northern Liberties and two in Penn Township. A model school was erected on the side of Chester Street, above Race. The first Superintendent of schools was Joseph Lancaster.
  • The team boat Peacock ran from Market Street Ferry to the mineral Springs on the Rancocas. The team boat Phoenix ran between Greenwich Point and Gloucester, propelled by the action of eight horses.
  • The legislature passed an act dividing the Northern Liberties into seven wards. The boundaries were as follows: First Ward, Vine Street to Willow, from the Delaware River to Third Street; the second Ward, from Third Street to Sixth, and from Vine to Willow; Third Ward, from Third Street to Delaware, between Willow and Green streets, and Wells Alley, commonly called Whitehall Street; the Forth Ward, from Third Street to Sixth, between Willow and Green, Fifth Ward, from Third Street to the Delaware River, between Green Street and Poplar Lane, and that part of Cohocksink Creek called the Canal; Sixth Ward, from Third Street to Sixth, between Green street and Poplar Lane; Seventh Ward bounded by Cohocksink Creek on the North and east, Poplar Street to the South, and Sixth Street on the west. "There are now in the city and liberties thirty-four engines and fifteen thousand feet of hose, under the direction of forty-nine companies. These companies are all willing to receive new members."
  • In order to prevent danger as much as possible it was directed that the manner in which power should be transported from vessels in the Delaware River to the magazine on the Grays Ferry Road should be by landing at Conoroe & Co.'s Wharf, in the village of Richmond; thence up Ann Street west to Frankford Road; down that road to the Black Horse and Mud Lane (Montgomery Avenue); thence to Sixth Street; down the latter to Hickory Lane (Coates Street, now Fairmont Avenue); thence west crossing the Ridge Road, to Broad Street, and to the Callowhill turnpike road; thence west to Schuylkill Front Street (Twenty- Second); down the same, and by way of the Grays Ferry Road to the destination. The intention was that the powder should be carried at a distance from the built-up portions of the city.
  • March 9. Masonic Hall, Chestnut Street between Seventh and Eighth Streets, burned.
  • April 19. Work commenced on Fairmount Water Works. Completed 1822.
  • In the United States Gazette appeared an advertisement, Orders for Leigh Coal will be received at 172 Arch Street "in quantities not less than one ton, at thirty cents per bushel of eighty pounds." The coal may be seen burning at the above place.
  • September 8. Vauxhall Garden, N.E. Cor. Broad and Walnut Streets, destroyed by a mob.
  • Coal was being consumed. In this year the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company delivered three hundred and sixty five tons of coal to Philadelphia.
  • March 20. The Legislature passed an act to provide a State penitentiary within the city and county of Philadelphia. The Cherry Hill farm property on the north side of Francis Lane (later on Coates Street, now Fairmount Avenue) west of the Ridge Road (Corinthian Ave. and Fairmount Ave.). Cornerstone laid on May 22d. Incorporation of Apprentices Library.
  • May 9. South Street Theater (below Fifth Street) burned.
  • May 31. Turner Camac conveys to the bible Christian Society a lot of ground on the west side of Third Street above Girard Avenue, sixty feet front and two hundred feet deep to a twenty feet wide alley. On this plot was erected a church later on sold to Louis and William Burk. The bricks forming the sidewalk fronting this church were studded with nails.
  • March 31. Legislature incorporated a company to construct a railroad from Philadelphia to Columbia, in Lancaster County; the company to be called "The President, Directors and Company of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company."
  • During the year Schuylkill water was introduced into 3,954 private houses, and 185 manufactories.
  • May 9. Fire in the Northern Liberties, Third Street near Brown. About thirty houses destroyed.
  • September 27. Arrival of Gen. Lafayette in Philadelphia stopping and sleeping at the Frankford Arsenal.
  • Grand procession on the 28th. Reception in Independence Hall.
  • A census taken in 1824 showed that the city contained fifty-five printing offices, one hundred and fifty printers.
  • August. Stephen Heimer, a watchman, set upon and killed at corner of Third and George Streets. this precipitated a riot among the weavers residing in this neighborhood.
  • October 1. Arch Street Theatre opened, Arch Street above Sixth.
  • December 6. The Reading mail coach which left the city with nine passengers, held up by three men on the Ridge Road and Turner's Lane (Oxford Street). James Porter, George Wilson and John Poteet afterwards arrested and convicted. Poteet turned State's evidence. Porter executed at Bush Hill on July 2, 1830.
  • December 26. Stephen Girard, a native of France but for many years an active merchant and citizen of Philadelphia, died in his house, Water Street above Market. He was buried on the 30th of December at the Roman Catholic Church of the Holy Trinity, Sixth and Spruce Streets. The remains were transferred in 1850 to the sarcophagus in Girard College, under the control of members of the Masonic order. At his death the value of his estate was appraised at $7,500,000.
  • February 22. Cornerstone of the Merchants' Exchange laid.
  • April 2. Cornerstone of the Moyamensing Prison laid.
  • June 6. The Philadelphia and Norristown Railroad opened to Germantown.
  • July 5. Cholera commenced. Ended October 4. Deaths, 935.
  • August 10-12. Race riots between whites and blacks at and adjacent to a flying horse exhibition (carousel) South Street above Seventh. Three hundred special constables sworn in to quell the nightly riots.
  • September 13. West Chester Railroad opened to the intersection of Columbia Railroad.
  • March 4. William Penn steamboat burned below the Navy Yard.
  • September 28. St. Michael's R.C. Church consecrated.
  • October 14. Political riot in Moyamensing. Robb's Row, Christian Street above Ninth, burned.
  • February 8. Philadelphia Gas Works went into operation.
  • February 22. An ox roasted on the ice of the Delaware River, near Smith's Island (in the Delaware, opposite Chestnut Street).
  • March 15. The Commissioners passed an ordinance establishing the Northern Liberties Gas Works. Capital, $200,000.
  • April 1. Upper Ferry Bridge burned.
  • May 14. Pennsylvania Hall, corner Sixth and Haines (Cresson) Streets, attacked by a mob.
  • May 17. Pennsylvania Hall burned.
  • May 18. Shelter for Colored Orphans, Thirteenth Street, above Callowhill, burned by a mob.
  • October 4. Great fire on Chestnut Street Wharf, Delaware.
  • December 17. Schuylkill Bank failed.
  • January 15. The banks resumed specie payments.
  • February 4. Bank of the United States failed and other banks suspended specie payments.
  • January 20. Celebration of the opening of; the Reading and Pottsville Railroad.
  • August 1. Abolition Riots. African Presbyterian Church, St. Mary's Street, and Smith's Hall, Lombard Street, burned.
  • August 26. Reading Railroad bridge and the old bridge at the Falls of Schuylkill destroyed by fire.
  • Ground purchased at the southeast corner of Fifth Street and Franklin Avenue (Girard Avenue) for the erection of a German Catholic Church. Purchase price $11,700.
  • January 11. Weavers' Riots in Kensington, (Germantown Avenue and Master Street). Rioters assemble at "The Nanny Goat" Market, Washington (American) Street north of Master. Sheriff's posse assailed and beaten. Rioters later dispersed by General Cadwalader's brigade.
  • August 15. Cornerstone laid of Roman Catholic Church of St. Peter, Fifth Street and Franklin Avenue (Girard Avenue). Solemnly consecrated February 14, 1847. In 1853 the Christian Brothers took charge of the boys' school.
  • May 6. Riots in Kensington. Several killed.
  • May 7. Riots renewed in Kensington. More people killed.
  • May 8. Riots continued. St. Michael's Church (Second and Jefferson Streets) with the Female Seminary adjourning, burned in the afternoon. St. Augustine's Church (Fourth and New Streets) burned in the evening. All of above buildings totally destroyed.
  • July 7. (Sunday). riots in Southwark; Church of St. Philip de Neri attacked. Fight at night between the military and the rioters; several persons killed.
  • July 24. This is considered as the foundation date of the establishing of Fairmount Park. On this date the city purchased from the assignees of the defunct Bank of the United States the estate known as Lemon Hill, formerly the estate of Henry Pratt, fifty-two acres for $75,000. Sedgely, north of Lemon Hill, was acquired in 1856. The Landsdown property, on the west side of the Schuylkill, was acquired in 1866.
  • April 12. By act of Assembly, the city of Philadelphia and the incorporated districts of Spring Garden, Northern Liberties and Penn, and the township of Moyamensing are required to establish and maintain police forces of "not less than one able-bodied man for one hundred and fifty taxable inhabitants" for the prevention of riots and the preservation of the public peace.
  • July 4. Cornerstone of St. Anne's R.C. Church laid at Memphis Street and Leigh Avenue.
  • December 29. St. Peter's R.C. Church dedicated.
  • May 11. Congress of the United States declared that war existed by the act of the republic of Mexico. Ten million dollars appropriated and the President authorized to call out fifty thousand volunteers.
  • May 13. The journeymen printers met at Keystone hall and resolved that they would take up their shooting sticks in their country's cause.
  • August 24. Cornerstone laid of new St. Michael's R.C. Church, to replace the one destroyed by fire in 1844.
  • September 17. Old Fellow' Hall, Sixth and Haines (Cresson) Streets, dedicated.
  • November 5. St. Anne's R. C. Church dedicated.
  • February 7. Dedication of the new St. Michael's R.C. Church.
  • February 14. St. Peter's R.C. Church consecrated.
  • April 15. two elephants were drowned in the Delaware River in attempting to swim from Greenwich Point to Gloucester Point, New Jersey.
  • August 21. At the sugar refinery of George L. Broome & Co., Bread Street near Quarry, twenty-seven men struck down by falling walls. They were members of Fairmount engine and Perseverance Hose Companies. Andrew Butler and Charles H. Himes, members of the Perseverance Hose Company, killed. They were buried at the same time, the funeral was attended by fifty-one fire companies, numbering over three thousand members. The line of march estimated to be three miles long.
  • February 27. Incorporation of the district of Richmond in the county of Philadelphia. Bounded on the east by the Delaware River, on the north by Westmoreland Street, along the same westward to the westward side of Emerald Street, along the same to the southerly side of Hart Lane, and along the latter to the northern boundary of Kensington district, and by the same to the Delaware River and place of beginning. March 25, 1848, the boundaries were extended to beginning at the river Delaware, on the west side of Westmoreland Street,, and extending along the river to the north side of Tioga Street; thence along Tioga to the east side of the Point Road; along the Point Road to Westmoreland Street, and along the same to the place of beginning.
  • July 9. Great fire which commenced on Vine Street Wharf and destroyed three hundred and sixty-seven houses.
  • October 18 and 19. Jenny Lind, "the Nightingale," managed by P.T. Barnum, sang both evenings at Musical Fund Hall, on Locust Street. The two concerts netted $19,000, a sum unprecedented for such entertainment.
  • March 18. Assembly Building, S. W. Corner Tenth and Chestnut Streets, burned.
  • December 24. Public reception to Louis Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot.
  • December 26. Hart's Building and the Shakespeare Building at Sixth and Chestnut Streets burned.
  • December 30. Barnum's Museum, corner Seventh and Chestnut Streets, burned.
  • February 2. Consolidation Act passed.
  • July 5. Chinese Museum at Ninth and Sansom Streets, and National Theatre, Chestnut Street, Below Ninth, burned.
  • July 1. The long wharf of Merrick & sons, at the foot of Reed Street, Delaware River, Frequently used by the residents of the neighborhood as a recreation resort, caved in; ten persons drowned.
  • July 17. An excursion train on the North Pennsylvania Railroad leaving the Cohocksink depot, Germantown Avenue and Thompson Street, containing about six hundred children and young people of St. Michael's R. C. Church, on reaching Camp Hill, near Ambler, collided head-on with a train going southward. Fifty dead and one hundred injured.
  • September 21. Banks suspended.
  • October 12. The ship Cathedral drawing twenty-five feet four inches of water, being unable to get into New York, and cross the bar, came to Philadelphia up the Delaware without difficulty.
  • January 18. Tremendous snowfall and gale. The thermometer touching zero. Numerous fire alarms to which the volunteer firemen gallantly responded. Fire destroyed Tabernacle Methodist Church, Eleventh below Oxford Street.
  • January 26. The Academy of Music opens for its first season, which will include the American premiere of Verdi's opera Il Trovatore. Today, it is the oldest grand opera theatre still used for its original purpose in the United States.
  • February 26. Opening of the Academy of Music, Broad and Locust Streets. Production of Il Trovatore, with Brignold and Gazzaniga in the principal characters.
  • September 25. Financial panic of 1857 precipitated. Bank of Pennsylvania closed its doors. Other banks suspended specie payments.
  • November 2. Dedication of the new hall and parade of the American United Mechanics, Northeast Corner of Fourth and George Streets.
  • January 4. Fire, factory, Lawrence Street above Brown. Loss, $35,000. Steam fire engines in efficient operation.
  • March 3. Great fire, Second Street below Dock. Seventeen families burned out.
  • March 14. Girard College Railroad goes into operation . (Ridge Avenue line).
  • March 24. Chestnut and Walnut Street Railway, act of legislature, approved by council and bill signed by mayor. Company agreed to pay $100,000 towards bridge over the Schuylkill.
  • March 27. Holy Trinity Church, Nineteenth and Walnut Streets, opened.
  • April 19. new Western Market, Sixteenth and Market Streets, opened.
  • May 30. Sunday cars run on Green and Coates Streets, (Fairmount Avenue) Railway.
  • June 23. Arch Street Railway to Fairmount commences operations.
  • July 17. (Sunday) Green and Coates Streets cars stopped by order of the Mayor.
  • July 21-23. Sunday car case argument on habeas corpus before Justice Thompson of Supreme Court.
  • July 23. Indignation meeting in Independence Square on Sunday cars.
  • August 15. Grand trial of steam fire engines at Fairmount on account of visit of City Council of Cincinnati.
  • August 20. Great fire. Stout's Planing Mill and Sewing Machine Factory, 18th Ward. Loss very heavy.
  • September 8. Great fire. Good Intent Mills, 24th Ward.
  • October 1. Fire. Hughes Hay Press, Jefferson Avenue and Marriott Street. No water to be had.
  • October 24. Chestnut and Walnut Streets cars commence running to Twenty-second Street.
  • November 21. market sheds in Market Street between Front and Eighth, demolition commenced.
  • December 25. Dedication of Siloam Methodist Episcopal Church, Wood and Brown Streets (E. Susqehanna Avenue and Moyer Street).
  • December 28. Washington Street Wharf fixed upon as the Delaware terminus of Pennsylvania Railroad.
  • January 5. Bishop John Nepomucene Neumann falls dead at Thirteenth and Vine Streets.
  • January 9. Obsequies of Bishop Neumann at St. Johns Cathedral, Thirteenth Street above Chestnut. Buried at St. Peter's Church, Fifth Street and Girard Avenue.
  • February 13. Continental Hotel open for visitors, and open for quests February 16.
  • April 25. Public Building Commission holds its first meeting under act of legislature.
  • May 7. Fire, Tattersall's Stables, Filbert, below Thirteenth. 28 horses burned.
  • May 24. Fire, Richmond and Schuylkill River Railway (Girard Avenue line) Depot, Girard Avenue and Twenty-Sixth Street.
  • May 24. Cornerstone of Episcopal Hospital, Lehigh Avenue and Front Street, laid.
  • July 6. Public Buildings Commissioners decide on Penn Square as the site of the court houses.
  • July 13. Fire. Kimball & Gorton's car factory, Fifteenth Ward.
  • July 22. Fire. Yard, Gilmore & Co.'s store, 40-42 North Third Street. Loss, $50,000.
  • July 26. Tremendous tornado at Camden, NJ. Factory blown down. Three men killed.
  • September 6. Plans for Public Building adopted.
  • September 20. Contracts for Public Buildings awarded to John McArthur, Jr.
  • October 9-11. Visit of Prince of Wales.
  • October 19. Fire. Franklin Building, Sixth Street, below Arch.
  • November 12. Sensation from threats of secession at the South. Great depression of stocks.
  • November 22. Philadelphia banks suspend specie payments.
  • November 23. Destructive fire, Twelfth and Willow Streets.
  • January 3. Meeting of citizens at Board of Trade rooms, to take action concerning the peril of the Union.
  • January 7. Destructive fire, Maule & Bros., lumber-yard, Twenty-third and South Streets.
  • February 10. Ship John Trucks cut through by ice and sunk at Arch Street Wharf, Delaware River.
  • April. War excitement.
  • April 23. Whale caught in the Delaware opposite the city.
  • May 8. First Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers march South.
  • July 4. Grand parade of Gray Reserves and Home Guards.
  • September 4. Seizure of property belonging to rebels.
  • September 10. Ferry boat Curlew with 142 head of cattle aboard, sunk in the Delaware. Most of the cattle escaped.
  • September 14. Fire in Continental Theatre, Walnut Street above Eighth. Fourteen ballet girls burned, nine whom died.
  • October 19. Boiler explosion at I. P. Morris' machine works, Richmond. Two men killed.
  • October 30. Fire. Cotton and woolen mills, Twelfth Street and Washington Avenue. Loss $100,000.
  • November 5. Explosion at Bridesburg Arsenal. Two men killed.
  • March 29. Explosion at cartridge factory of Prof. Jackson, Tenth Street near Moyamensing Avenue. Houses in vicinity shattered, seventeen persons died from injuries.
  • April 20. Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul, Logan Square, opened.
  • June 17. City Councils pass an ordinance appropriating $310,000 for purchase of League Island, to be presented to the United States as a naval station for construction of ironclads.
  • July 17. Gold eighteen and a half percent. Premium. Silver thirteen per cent. Great scarcity of specie and small change.
  • July 19. Postage stamps and car tickets put in circulation for small change.
  • September 5. Funeral of Col. John A. Koltes.
  • September 8. Independence Square made a recruiting camp.
  • September 12. Tremendous rains. Cohocksink Creek overflows. Several lives lost. Great damage in upper part of city.
  • October 16. Gold at thirty-seven per cent. Premium.
  • October 18. Destructive fire at Ninth and Market Streets.
  • February 25. Gold reaches seventy-two per cent. Premium.
  • February 26. New post office building, Chestnut Street below Fifth (now eastern portion of Drexel Building) opened for business.
  • May 2. Fire. Car factory, Nineteenth and Market Streets. Loss, $100,000.
  • June 16. Mayor Henry issues a proclamation calling on the citizens to close their places of business and prepare to defend the State. State House bell tolled a 3 P.M. A large assembly convened in Independence Square.
  • June 29. A general mustering for defense of the advance of Lee. Earthworks constructed on roads leading to the city.
  • July 15. Draft commences in Fourth Congressional District.
  • August 24. Grand German festival at Washington Retreat. (Fairmount Park).
  • September 24. Grand review of colored troops at Chelten Hills. (Camp William Penn).
  • October 3. Grand parade of colored troops.
  • November 7. Dummy engines commence running from the depot of the Fifth and Sixth Street Railway, Fourth and Berks Streets to Frankford. They proved very satisfactory.
  • December 18. Destructive fore in a petroleum warehouse, Delaware Avenue below Almond Street.
  • December 22. Cooper's Shop Soldiers Home dedicated.
  • December 23. Grand military procession to receive 29th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.
  • December 23. West end of Grays' Ferry bridge burned.
  • March 1. Ringing of State House bell for ordinary fires forbidden by Mayor Henry.
  • March 5. Old Fish Market at foot of Market Street vacated.
  • March 27. Destructive fire at Ninth and Wallace Streets.
  • April 20. Grant's candle factory, Fifteenth Ward, burned. Loss, $75,000.
  • April 25. Boiler explosion, Cornelius & Baker's chandelier factory, Cherry Street above Eighth. Several killed and injured.
  • May 19. Coal Oil Refinery, Twenty-third and Arch Streets, burned.
  • May 24. Destructive fire, Twelfth and Willow Streets.
  • June 7. Opening of Great Central Fair, Logan Square. Receipts of Fair, over $1,000,000.
  • July 22. Simon's Wagon Works, Second and Huntingdon Streets, entirely destroyed by incendiary fire.
  • August 12. Grand reception Baxter's Fire Zouaves (72d Pennsylvania Volunteers).
  • September 24 Fall of iron rafters at the new depot, Philadelphia and Erie Railroad, Market and Sixteenth Streets; several persons killed, others injured.
  • Large unfinished building at northwest corner of Eighth and Vine Streets, falls down.
  • November 20. Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul, Logan Square, consecrated.
  • December 26. Serious riots among coal heavers, Port Richmond.
  • January 28. Delaware River frozen over; people crossed over to New Jersey.
  • February 1. Passenger railway fares raised to 7 cents.
  • February 8. Disastrous conflagration at Ninth and Washington Streets. Fire originated in coal-oil establishment. Fifty dwelling
  • houses burned. Several persons perished. Streets filled with snow, and banked up the burning coal-oil, forming a sea of fire.
  • February 23. Draft commences in First an Second Wards.
  • February 24. Draft in Third, Fourth and Seventh Wards.
  • February 27. Draft in Sixth and Ninth Wards.
  • March 14. Mrs. Rachel Hancock dies from effects of a shot which the provost Guard was firing at a deserter in Fourth Street, near Buttonwood.
  • March 22. Draft in Twenty-Fifth Ward.
  • April 3. News of capture of Richmond, Va. Great rejoicing. State House bell rung. Blowing of steam whistles and ringing of hose carriage bells, and striking of gongs in front of Independence Hall. Parade of firemen. Mass meeting in front of Custom House. Illumination in evening.
  • April 9. News of surrender of Lee's Army. Illumination, blowing of steam whistles and ringing of fire bells. Firing of cannon.
  • April 15. News of assassination of President Lincoln at Ford's Theatre on the evening of Good Friday, April 14, General mourning throughout the city.
  • April 22. President Lincoln's body escorted to Independence Hall by a large military and civic precession.
  • May 14. New Union League House, Broad and Sansom Streets, opened.
  • May 17. Merrick's foundry partially destroyed by fire. Loss $75,000.
  • June 10. Review of returned Philadelphia troops, General Meade commanding.
  • June 24. Reception of General Grant at Union League House.
  • June 27. Fire. Joseph B. Biddle & Co.'s fire works store, 108-110 South Delaware Avenue. Loss, $100,000.
  • June 28. Fire. C.J. Fell & Co.'s spice establishment, 120 South Front Street. Loss, $70,000.
  • July 1. Spire of German Reformed Church, Green above Fifteenth Street, blown down; no one hurt.
  • July 3. Mary Ridey kills, by stabbing, two brothers, Joseph and Isaac Sides, at 1170 North Third Street, a house known as "The New Idea."
  • August 10. Large sale of Government vessels at the Navy Yard.
  • August 12. St. George's M. E. Church, fourth Street, Below New, partially destroyed by fire.
  • August 28. Union and Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloons closed. Imposing ceremonies at the Academy of Music.
  • October 3. Great fire. French, Richards & Co.'s drug establishment, Tenth and Market Streets. Loss, near $300,000.
  • October 8. Fire, Coal-oil sheds, Dickinson Street Wharf. Loss, $100,000.
  • October 16, Grand parade of volunteer Firemen. In line 102 hose carriages, 57 steam fire engines, 11 hand engines, 12 hook and ladder trucks, 26 ambulances, including 30 companies from other cities.
  • November 29. Boiler explosion, Penn Treaty Iron Works, one man killed, three injured.
  • December 2. Landreth Public School partially destroyed by fire.
  • December 28. City Councils pass ordinance for the erection of a new court house on Sixth Street side of Independence Square.
  • January 2. Great fire, 607 Chestnut Street. Loss $150,000.
  • January 7. Coldest night known; thermometer 18 degrees below zero. Delaware and Schuylkill frozen over.
  • Centenary services of the Methodist Episcopal Church, held at St. George's Church, Fourth below New Street.
  • January 20. Fenian mass meeting at Sansom Street Hall.
  • January 30. Fire, Delaware Avenue below Vine Street. Loss, $100,000.
  • February 22. Firemen's procession on the return of Hibernian steam fire engine after four years' service at Fortress Monroe.
  • February 26. Great fire extending from George H. Robert's' hardware store, 235-237 North Third Street, James, Kent and Santee, wholesale dry goods house, 237 and 239, Smith & Shoemakers', wholesale drug house, and others. Loss, $800,000. One man killed and nine injured by falling wall.
  • April 11. Christopher Deering and family murdered by Antoine Probst, on a farm in the southern section of the city. Probst hung on June 8th.
  • May 13. Chestnut and Walnut Street Railway commenced west of new Chestnut Street Bridge.
  • June 9. Great fire at Dearie's Mill, Twenty-Fifth and Callowhill Street. Loss $200,000.
  • June 23. Chestnut Street Bridge Formally opened by the Mayor.
  • July 4. Grand Parade. Representatives from over one hundred veteran regiments, and the orphan children of soldiers and sailors killed during the rebellion. State flags carried by the color-guards restored to the State. Ceremonies in Independence Square. Presentation made by the Mayor General George G. Meade and flags received by Governor Andrew G. Curtin.
  • July 5. Fire, Baker & McFadden's planing-mill, Hillsdale Street below Race (east of Fourth Street). Loss, $100,000.
  • July 7. Fire, Fitler, Weaver & Co.'s rope factory, Germantown Avenue and Tenth Street (fronting this factory was the toll-gate, Germantown Pike). Loss, &130,000.
  • July 12. Great fire, Tacony Print Works, Frankford, belonging to A. S. Lippincott. Loss, $1,000,000.
  • July 26. Boiler explosion. Yewdalls Mills, Hestonville. Three persons killed.
  • July 27. Fire, Biddle & Co.'s hardware store, 509 Commerce Street. Loss, $150,000.
  • August 4. Moyamensing Hall, Christian Street above 9th, set on fire and totally destroyed. The deed was committed by persons opposed to the use of the hall as a cholera hospital, cholera prevailing at this time.
  • November 3. City iceboat launched.
  • December 14. North Broad Street opened from Nicetown Lane to Fisher's Lane.
  • December 23. Fire. Gustav Bergner's malt-house, 31st and Thompson Streets; loss, $1000,000.
  • June 4. Cornerstone of the new hall, Improved Order of Red Men, S. W. Cor Third and Brown Streets, laid.
  • June 6. Explosion at steam saw-mill of Geasy and Ward, Sansom Street, between 10th and 11th. Twenty-two persons killed (some being burned alive) and seven injured. A relief fund of $15,000 raised for the families of the sufferers.
  • June 19. American Theatre, Walnut between 8th and 9th, destroyed by fire. Ten persons killed by the falling of the front wall.
  • June 17. Grand parade of societies participating in Tenth General Saengerfest at Engel & Wolf's farm. (Fairmount Park, vicinity of Grant Monument.)
  • August 27. Cornerstone laid of new Siloam Methodist Church, Wood Street above Duke (E. Susquehanna Avenue above Thompson Street).
  • September 26. Grand reception of Gen. Philip H. Sheridan; great military and civic display.
  • November 28. Obsequies of David M. Lyle, Chief engineer of Fire Department, who was found dead in his office November 25th. Grand procession of military, firemen and citizens.
  • January 8. Great Fenian demonstration and obsequies in honor of Allen, Larkin and O'Brien.
  • April 27. Boiler explosion, Penn treaty Iron Works, Beach above Marlborough street. Five persons killed.
  • July 17. Strike of firemen at Gas Works. City in total darkness. July 18th advance of wages granted, and work resumed.
  • July 30. Charles E. Becker, proprietor of a zoological garden, in the rear of his saloon, 441-443 North Ninth Street, bitten by a rattle-snake, and dies in twenty minutes.
  • Ice-house of Star Ice Company, on the Schuylkill above Girard Ave., falls, injuring 9 men and killing 3 horses.
  • August 4. Cotton and woolen mill of John Brown & Sons, Moyamensing Ave, and Moore Street, burned. Loss, $105,000.
  • August 11. Parade of Independent Order of Red Men, and dedication of the hall at S. W. Cor. Third and Brown Streets.
  • Conflagration at Front and New Streets. Loss, 70,000.
  • September 28. Brig Sunny South, loaded with coal-oil, explodes near Chester; Capt. James R,, Kelly, pilot, of Philadelphia, killed.
  • October 1. Mass Convention, "Boys in Blue," of the United States, being discharged soldiers of the U.S. Army.
  • October 2. Parade of "Boys in Blue."
  • October 17. George W. Childs, of Public Ledger, presents burial lot in Woodland Cemetery, valued at $8,000, to the Philadelphia Typographical Society.
  • October 22. Mrs. Mary E. Hill killed in her house, N.E. Cor. Tenth and Pine Streets. George S. Twitchell, Jr., and his wife, the daughter of Mrs. Hill, arrested on the charge of having committed the murder. Subsequently Twitchell was found guilty and sentenced to be hung. On
  • April 8th, the day he was to be executed, committed suicide. Mrs. Twitchell acquitted.
  • November 25. City Museum Theatre, Callowhill Street between Fourth and Fifth, destroyed by fire. Rebuilt and opened as Concordia Theatre. Later bottling establishment of John F. Betz & Son.
  • December 3. fire, 619-623 Market Street. Loss $150,000.
  • December 4. Ferry boat Brooklyn, belonging to Gloucester Ferry Company, destroyed by fire. Loss, $30,000.
  • December 23. John and Rebecca George present 83 acres of land, known as "George's Hill," to the city as an addition to Fairmount Park.
  • December 30. Depot of 2d and 3d Street Railroad destroyed by fire.
  • January 7. The commission appointed to provide for the erection of new public building, meet and organize.
  • January 14. Jewelry establishment of J, E. Caldwell, Chestnut Street, above Ninth, destroyed by fire. Two clerks in Caldwell's store were burned to death.
  • February 21. Mrs. Lydia R. Bailey, a well- known printer, dies in her 91st year.
  • March 24. Joseph W. Smith, janitor of hall at Sixth Street and Girard Ave., found dead; Corner's jury rendered a verdict that his death was caused by violence.
  • April 4. The Beneficial Saving Society robbed of $1,000,000 in bonds by burglars; bonds subsequently returned.
  • April 6. The new building of the Fidelity Insurance, Trust and Safe Deposit Company opened.
  • April 26. Grand parade of Odd Fellows on occasion of the semi-centennial celebration.
  • April 28. Burning of the old depot of the Germantown and Norristown Railroad Co., Ninth and Green Streets.
  • April 29. Skating Rink, at 21st and Race Streets, burned.
  • May 3. The steam canal-barge Fulton sunk at the foot of Walnut Street. Two men drowned.
  • May 10. The cornerstone of Zion German Lutheran Church, Franklin Street below Vine, laid.
  • May 12. Parade of the Improved Order of Red Men. Imposing display.
  • May 17. John Dobson's blanket factory, Falls of Schuylkill, destroyed by fire. Pennypacker & Sildey's panel factory, Willow Street above 11th, burned down.
  • May 31. The will of Dr. James Rush, bequeathing over $1,000,000 to the Philadelphia Library Company, admitted to probate.
  • June 20. The carriage of the West Philadelphia Hose Co. is thrown into the Schuylkill by a party of rowdies.
  • June 21. The Independent Order of Druids celebrate their twenty-fifth anniversary at Washington Retreat.
  • June 23. Vista drive at Fairmount Park, opened by Park Commissioners.
  • June 25. Destructive fire at Sixth Street and Columbia Ave. Loss, $250,000.
  • June 26. Cornerstone of First Reformed Church, Seventh Street below Oxford, laid.
  • June 30. Raid made on the unlicensed distilleries in the Twenty-Fifth Ward. Revenue officers accompanied by a corps of marines.
  • July 4. German Lutheran Church, Fourth and Carpenter Streets, Consecrated.
  • July 5. Unveiling the statue of Washington Monument in front of Independence Hall. Dedicated by the school children.
  • July 13. The Third Reformed Church, Tenth and Filbert Streets, damaged by fire.
  • July 15. New building of the Mercantile Library, Tenth Street above Chestnut, inaugurated with appropriate ceremonies.
  • July 20. cornerstone of the German Synagogue, "Rodef Sholem," laid.
  • August 4. Great conflagration of Col. W. C. Patterson's bonded warehouse, Front and Lombard Streets. Thousands of barrels of whiskey burnt. Loss over $2,000,000.
  • August 15. Destruction of the Boston Fish Company's building, Fifth Street and Columbia Avenue. Loss over $50,000.
  • August 16. Scarcity of water in the Schuylkill. Steam fire engines used to pump water into Fairmount basin.
  • August 24. Large factory building, Ninth and Wallace Streets, destroyed by fire. Loss, $100,000.
  • August 26. Additional steam fire-engines used to pump water into Fairmount basin.
  • August 28. The Tax Receiver's office at Sixth and Chestnut Streets entered and robbed of $28,000.
  • August 31. The art store of James S. Earle & Sons, Chestnut Street below Ninth, destroyed by fire. Loss over $100,000.
  • September 12. Burning of spice mills, 137 North Front Street. Loss, $40,000.
  • September 13. The Humboldt Centennial celebrated by a parade and laying the cornerstone of a monument in Fairmount Park.
  • September 16. Barrel manufactory of W. B. Thomas, 12th and Buttonwood Streets destroyed by fire. Loss, $50,000.
  • October 3. The tide in the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers overflow the wharves and fill cellars.
  • October 19. The stockholders of the Philadelphia Library Company vote in favor of accepting the legacy of Dr. Rush.
  • November 24. Centennial celebration at St. George's M. E. Church.
  • February 3. Horace Binney, Jr., a noted lawyer, dies.
  • February 17. The cotton mill of J. P. Bruner & Sons, Twenty-fourth and Hamilton Streets, destroyed by fire. Loss, $200,000.
  • February 22. Parade of firemen and dedication of monument to the late Chief Engineer David M. Lyle.
  • March 8. Tremendous hailstorm; hail fell for twenty minutes, some of the hailstones larger than hen eggs; great destruction of windows.
  • June 13. Gaul's brewery, New Market and Callowhill Streets, destroyed by fire.
  • June 29. Robert J. Hemphill, secretary to the Board of School Controllers from 1849-1862, dies.
  • July 10. Flour-mill of Rowland & Ervien, Broad Street below Vine, destroyed by fire; rioting among firemen, and carriage of Goodwill engine is thrown in the Schuylkill.
  • July 26. Sugar refinery of Newhall, Brewery destroyed by fire.
  • August 27. Coulson's planing mill, Twenty-fourth and brown Streets destroyed by fire.
  • September 6. Smith & Harper's saw-mill, beach and Coates (Fairmount Ave.) Streets, destroyed by fire; loss over $475,000.
  • The new synagogue "Rodef Sholem" dedicated.
  • September 11. The cornerstone of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Front and Canal (Allen) Streets, laid.
  • Zion German Lutheran Church, Franklin Street below Vine, dedicated.
  • September 17. The planing mill of N. F. Wood, Spruce Street Wharf, Schuykill, destroyed by fire.
  • September 22. Race on the Schuylkill between the Nassau boat Club of New York, and a crew of Philadelphians, won by the New Yorkers.
  • October 11. Penn Square selected as the site for the Public Buildings by a vote of the people, the vote being 51,623 for Penn Square, and 32,825 for Washington Square.
  • October 20. The chair factory of George Fennen, 1730 North Fifth Street, destroyed by fire.
  • November 9. The schooner Harmonie capsized and sunk in the Delaware off South Street during a gale.
  • November 22. Steamboat City of Bridgeton burned while lying above Pier 7, North Wharves, on the Delaware. Loss about $70,000.
  • January 3. The Board of Commissioners of the Paid Fire Department meet and organize.
  • January 10. Rudolph Stein, of the firm of Stein & Jones, a well known printing firm, corner Hudson alley and Chestnut Street, dies suddenly.
  • January 22. The cabinet works of P.P. Weiss & Co., 622 North Twenty-fourth Street, destroyed by fire.
  • February 2. The Kensington Bank, Beach Street, below Laurel, entered by pretended policemen, and its vault robbed of bonds and cash to the amount of $100,000.
  • March 3. Opening of the Northern Dispensary with appropriate ceremonies.
  • March 15. The Paid Fire Department of the city goes into operation.
  • March 24. Mass meeting of citizens at Academy of Music to advocate the abolishment of the Public Building Commission.
  • March 30. the soldiers and sailors (colored) hold a meeting and parade in honor of the anniversary of the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment.
  • May 15. German peace celebration; procession nine miles long; various trades and occupations in line.
  • May 16. The German peace celebration continued, Picnic at the new Philadelphia Schuetzen Park, Indian Queen Lane.
  • May 27. Keystone Marble Works, market Street near Twentieth, damaged by fire; loss $65,000.
  • Warehouse of Malone & Co., 1126-28 Washington Ave., destroyed by fire.
  • June 5. Saw-mill of Stanley & Neber, Marshall Street, below Girard Avenue, destroyed by fire. Also about forty other buildings. Loss, $150,000.
  • June 15. Cornerstone of new building of University of Pennsylvania, Thirty-fourth and Locust Streets, laid with impressive ceremonies.
  • June 15. Dedication of the New Methodist Episcopal Home for the Aged and Infirm, Lehigh Ave. and 13th St.
  • June 23. Gillingham & Garrison's saw-mill, Richmond and Norris Streets, destroyed by fire. Loss, $40,000
  • June 24. Monument to the memory of William B, Schneider, late Grand Tyler, Masonic fraternity, dedicated at Mt. Moriah Cemetery.
  • July 11. Pattern-shop of I.P. Morris & Co., Port Richmond, struck by lightning and destroyed by fire; loss, $55,000.
  • July 17. Three boys, Cornelius Ryan, Samuel Glass and William Galvin, drowned in a brick pond at Seventeenth and Reed Streets.
  • August 28. Celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Philadelphia Schuetzen-Verein (Rifle Club) at the park of the association, Indian Queen Lane.
  • Six hundred kegs of powder, found on board a canal-boat on the Delaware, seized.
  • September 22. Lincoln Monument at Fairmont Park unveiled and dedicated.
  • September 24. Cornerstone laid of the German Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Michael, Trenton Ave. and Cumberland Street.
  • September 29, Jessup & Moore's paper warehouse, 524 North Street, destroyed by fire; loss, $200,000.
  • Jacob Schoenning's morocco factory, Randolph Street below Oxford, destroyed by fire; $90,000.
  • October 10. An election riot occurs in the fourth and Fifth Wards. Isaiah Chase and Octavius V. Catto, both colored, are shot and , and about seventeen men are wounded.
  • October 13. Mass meeting at National Hall to give expression to the feeling in regard to the murder of Major Octavius V. Catto, Principal of the Institute for Colored Youth.
  • October 15. Meeting held and collections taken up for the relief of the sufferers of the Chicago fire. Nearly $500,000 collected.
  • October 17. Old brick church building, Second Street above Poplar, used as an opera house by Samuel S. Sandford's Minstrels, destroyed by fire.
  • October 18. Parker & Macphilimy's planning-mill, Sixteenth and Fitzwater Streets, destroyed by fire.
  • October 20. Defalcation announced of City Treasurer, Joseph F. Marcer, in the sum of $478,000. This defalcation was caused by the failure of Chas. F. Yerkes, Jr., & Co., brokers, to whom the City Treasurer, contrary to law, had loaned the public money.
  • October 21. Planing-mill of William Barth, Trenton Ave. and Adams Street, destroyed by fire; loss, $11,000.
  • October 28. Charles F. Yerkes, Jr., broker for the City Treasurer, held in $50,000 bail to answer the charge of embezzlement, and $30,000 on the charge of larceny as bailee.
  • November 1. The grand jury presents bills of indictment against Joseph F. Marcer, City Treasurer, and William F. Yerkes, Jr.
  • November 4. Phosphate works of Watson & Clark, near the Point Breeze Gas works, destroyed by fire; loss, $150,000.
  • December 4. Reception of Grand Duke Alexis of Russia. Grand ball at the Academy of Music, in the evening.
  • December 5. Charles F. Yerkes, Jr., charged with embezzlement of funds belonging to the City of Philadelphia, sentenced to pay a fine of $500 and undergo an imprisonment of four years and nine months.
  • December 6. Joseph F. Marcer, City Treasurer, sentenced to an imprisonment of four years and nine months in the Eastern Penitentiary and to pay a fine of $300,000.00. Pardoned September 27, 1872.
  • December 19. Fourth National Bank, Arch Street below Fifth, stopped payment and failed.
  • December 25. Steam frigate Chattanooga sunk at League Island.
  • January 1. Hon. William S. Stokley inaugurated as Mayor of the city.
  • January 21. The new Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception at Front and Canal Streets opened with appropriate ceremonies.
  • Water pumped for the first time into the new reservoir of the Delaware Water Works at Sixth Streets and Lehigh Avenue.
  • February 4. Central Presbyterian Church, corner of Franklin and Thompson Streets, dedicated.
  • February 17. The new Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital, Seventeenth and Summer Streets, formally opened.
  • Steam-propelled Claymont sinks at Girard Wharf, about Market Street.
  • February 22. Meeting of the surviving soldiers of the War of 1812.
  • March 4. Centennial commission meets at Independence Hall.
  • New hall of the Philadelphia Rifle Club (Schuetzen Verein), North Third Street below Green, opened.
  • March 20. Simmons & Slocum's Opera House, 1005-07 Arch Street, burned.
  • March 25. The Pennsylvania Railroad Company commenced business at their new office, Fourth Street and Willings Alley.
  • April 2. Joseph Wittle, lion-tamer, mangled by a lion at "Porgey" O'Brian's menagerie, Frankford.
  • April 7. Trinity Reformed Church, Seventh Street below Oxford, dedicated.
  • April 17. The Public Buildings Commission annulled a former resolution directing that the buildings should be constructed upon the four Penn Squares, and ordering the erection of one building at he intersection of Broad and Market Streets.
  • May 5. Friend's Meeting House, northwest corner of Seventeenth Street and Girard Avenue, was opened for the first time for public worship.
  • May 27. Steam boiler explodes at the factory of Troth, Gordon & Co., Crease Street above Griard Avenue. Two persons killed and six injured.
  • June 1. The new Lincoln Market, corner of Broad and Coates (Fairmount Avenue) Streets, opened for business. (Later on site of the Hotel Lorraine).
  • June 13. National Amateur Regatta on the Schuylkill.
  • August 1. Spotted Tail, with eighteen other Indians and their wives, of the Upper Brule, Sioux tribe, arrived in this city, and the next day went upon an excursion to Cape May.
  • August 9. The Post Office Commission decided that the new post office should be placed on the lot northwest corner of Ninth and Chestnut Streets, containing 176 feet 9 inches on Chestnut Street and 378 feet 9 inches on Ninth Street.
  • The first stone of the foundation walls of the Public Buildings at Broad and Market Streets was laid at the southwest corner of the southwest square.
  • August 15. The iron steamship Pennsylvania, the first vessel of the American Steamship Company of Philadelphia, launched at Cramps' shipyard, Beach and Norris Streets. The ship was 355 feet over all in length, with a beam of 45 feet, a depth of 43 feet and a capacity of 3016 tons.
  • September 21. International Cricket Match between the English gentlemen 12 and 22 Philadelphia picked cricketers on the grounds of the Germantown Club, closed September 24th with the following score: Philadelphia, 22, first inning, 63; second inning, 74. English 12 first inning, 105; second inning, 34, with four wickets to go down.
  • September 23. Cornerstone of the Roman Catholic Church of St. Elizabeth laid at the southeast corner of Twenty-third and Berks Streets.
  • September 28. Fall regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Prize for single sculls won by Max Schmitt, three miles in 22m, 30s. Prize for six-oared barges was by the Iona of the Crescent Club, time, 21m, 34s. Prize for Junior single sculls won by Frank Street of the Pennsylvania Club, time 23m,33s. Prize for four-oared gigs won by the Pennsylvania Club, time, 20m, 20s. Prize for double scull gigs won by the Ariel of the University Club, time, 24m.
  • September 30. Medicine Bear, Long Fox, Red Thunder and thirty-one others of the Teton and Grand River Sioux Indians arrived in the city in charge of the Indian agents.
  • October 5. The managers of the German Hospital took formal possession of their new hospital, corner of Girard Avenue and Corinthian Avenue. Removing from their old location at Twentieth and Norris Streets.
  • October 7. New depot of the Reading Railroad Company at Chelten Avenue, Germantown, opened.
  • October 9. Cornerstone laid of the Jewish Hospital, Olney Road, near the York Pike.
  • October 11. The new building of the University of Pennsylvania at Thirty-fourth and Locust Streets, was dedicated.
  • October 26. Big Mouth, Milky Way and forty-five other Indians of the Comanche, Kiowa, Arrapalio, Apache, Washita, Caddo, Delaware, Kihi and Tawa Earac tribes arrived from Washington and were taken to the Girard House (Hotel, N. E. corner Ninth and Chestnut Streets).
  • October 28. The "epizooty," or horse disease, made its appearance in Philadelphia. It continued its ravages for about a month; during that time almost every horse in the city was affected. Two of the passenger railway companies during this period suspended the running of cars for six days; others suspended on Sundays, and ran but few cars on weekdays. The transportation of goods and other articles almost ceased for some days, and wagons and carts were drawn through the streets by men.
  • October 30. Cornerstone laid of the building of the Academy of Natural Sciences, S. W. corner Nineteenth and Race Streets.
  • The Ohio, the second iron steamship of the American Steamship Company, was launched at Cramps' Shipyard, Port Richmond.
  • November 11. Funeral of Major General George G. Meade, with impressive public ceremonies.
  • November 18. Meeting of committee of three hundred citizens appointed to obtain subscriptions to the stock of the corporation which is to manage the great Centennial Exposition of Industry of 1876.
  • November 20. The tercentenary of Presbyterianism was celebrated at the Penn Square Church, Broad Street above Chestnut.
  • November 27. City Councils fix the tax rate at $2.05, with ten cents public buildings tax.
  • November 28. Race on Schuylkill between eight-oared English-built shells. Won by boat Longfellow of Crescent Club, over Leviathan of Undine Club. Course 2-1/2 miles; time, 11.15m.
  • December 6. Fire at Warrington & Co.'s pen factory, northwest corner of Twelfth and Buttonwood Streets; loss, $25,000.
  • December 12. Edwin Forrest, the tragedian, dies.
  • December 15. St. Bonifacius R. C. Church, corner Hancock and Diamond Streets, dedicated.
  • German Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Peter, Forty-second and Myrtle Streets, West Philadelphia, dedicated.
  • Lehigh Avenue M. E. Church, Lehigh Avenue and Hancock Street, dedicated.
  • December 20. Fire at the stables of Forepaugh's circus and menagerie (winter quarters) Wister Street above Mill, Germantown: loss $100,000.
  • December 22. German Methodist Episcopal Church, York Street above Frankford Avenue, dedicated.
  • St. Elizabeth's R. C. Church, Twenty-third and Berks Streets, dedicated.
  • Grace Mission Presbyterian Church, Twenty-second and Federal Streets, dedicated.
  • December 30. Protestant Episcopal Church, St. James, Hestonville, consecrated.
  • December 31. Gottfried Kuehnle was killed at his residence and bakery, Frankford Road below Girard Avenue. Frederick Heidenblut, a journeyman under employ, tried for the crime, convicted and hung for the murder, January 20, 1875.
  • January 22. The boiler of the locomotive Kedge Hill exploded at American and Norris Streets, North Pennsylvania Railroad; one man killed, and several wounded.
  • February 6. City Councils pass an ordinance appropriating $500,000 in aid of the Centennial Exposition.
  • William Siner, member of Common Council from the Sixteenth Ward, was impeached before Select Council upon the charge of keeping a gambling-house.
  • March 25, The Indiana, the third ship of the American Steamship Co.'s line, launched at the ship-yard of William Cramp & Sons.
  • March 27. The Legislature of Pennsylvania passed a bill granting $1,000,000 to the Centennial Exposition, the same to be principally collected by a tax on the receipts of passenger railways.
  • April 13. Norris Square United Presbyterian Church, corner Hancock Street and Susquehanna Avenue, dedicated.
  • April 18. Explosion of a still filled with oil at the adamantine candle works of C. H. Grant & Co., southwest corner of Twenty-third and Hamilton Streets. Alexander Wilson and Samuel Walker, employees, burned and lost their lives.
  • April 24. Cornerstone laid of the Cumberland M. E. Church, southwest corner
  • Coral and Cumberland Streets.
  • April 27. Park Avenue M. E. Church, corner Park Avenue and Norris Street, dedicated.
  • May 18. German Evangelical Reformed Church, Thirty-eighth and Baring Streets, dedicated.
  • June 7. The steamship Illinois, the fourth vessel of the American Steamship Company, launched from the ship-yard of William Cramp & Sons.
  • June 14. Regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Prize for four-oared shells won by the Vesper, of the Vesper Club, in nineteen minutes and twenty-four seconds; course three miles. Prize for six-oar gunwale barges won by the Falcon, of the Pennsylvania Club; time, twenty-one minutes. Prize for four-oared gigs won by the Phantom, of the Pennsylvania Club, in twenty minutes and four and a half seconds.
  • June 22. Broad and Diamond Street Presbyterian Chapel, dedicated.
  • June 29. Cornerstone laid of the Lutheran Church at Roxborough.
  • June 30. Cornerstone laid of the Protestant Episcopal church, St. Peter's corner of Wayne Avenue and Harvey Street, Germantown.
  • July 4. The commissioners of Fairmount Park formally conveyed the U.S. Commissioners of the Centennial Exposition, and to the Centennial Board of Finance, at Lansdowne, in Fairmount Park, four hundred and fifty acres of land, for building and other purposes connected with the Centennial Exposition of 1876. Meeting of veterans of the war of 1812 at Independence Hall.
  • July 13. Services in commemoration of the hundredth anniversary of the meeting of the first Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, held in the Methodist churches.
  • July 31. Cornerstone laid of the Harriet Holland Mission (Presbyterian), Broad and Federal Streets.
  • August 6. Justice Beuislay ascended from Smith's Island (in the center of the Delaware River, opposite Chestnut Street) on a trapeze attached to a balloon expanded with hot air, which fell into the river Delaware shortly afterward, being carried a considerable distance before Beuislay was rescued from the water.
  • August 12. Very heavy rain fell continuing until next day. The rainfall being seven ad thirty-two hundredths inches. Great damage and loss, especially in the district east of Fifth Street, between Poplar and Oxford Streets.
  • August 17. Cornerstone laid of the chapel of Eighteenth Street M. E. Church, corner of Wharton Street and Herman Avenue.
  • August 20. Cornerstone laid of M. E. Mariners' Bethel Church, northwest corner of Moyamensing and Washington Avenues.
  • September 7. Chapel of the North Star Mission (Baptist), Seventh Street and Susquehanna Avenue, dedicated. Cornerstone laid of the Church of the United Brethren at Mount Airy.
  • September 9. Cornerstone laid of Second Baptist Church, Seventh Street below Girard Avenue.
  • September 14. The Jewish Hospital, Nineteenth Street and Olney Road, was dedicated.
  • Church of the Brethren (Drunkards), Marshall Street below Girard Avenue, dedicated.
  • Cornerstone laid of the First Presbyterian Church of Mantua, Thirty-fifth and Baring Streets.
  • September 16. Celebration of the Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Aztec Club, formed in the city of Mexico during the Mexican War by officers of the U.S. Army, held at the residence of Gen. Robert Patterson. Generals Grant, Hooker and many other officers being present.
  • September 18. The banking firms of Jay Cooke & Co., and E. W. Clarke & Co. suspended payment, which announcement was followed by great excitement. A run was commenced upon the Fidelity Safe Deposit and Trust Company, which was sustained during the day.
  • September 19. The financial panic continued. Great run upon the Fidelity Trust Company and Union Banking Company; both sustained demands. During the day several prominent brokers failed.
  • Great excitement throughout the United States in consequence of the failure of Jay Cooke & Co. In New York and other Atlantic cities there was a panic. Banks, Trust companies and individuals failed, and a panic and business revulsion commenced throughout the country.
  • September 25. Commencement of the ceremonies of dedication of the new Masonic Temple, Broad and Filbert Streets. Grand tournoi of Knights Templar at Academy of Music and Horticultural Hall. Gethsemane Baptist Church, corner of Eighteenth Street and Columbia Avenue, dedicated.
  • September 26. Great parade of the Masonic Order for the dedication of the new hall. The Grand Lodge and on hundred and seventy subordinate lodges were in line, the brethren numbering over eleven thousand men.
  • September 28. Cornerstone laid of German Reformed Salem Church, Fairmount Avenue below Fourth Street.
  • The Roman Catholic Church of Our Mother of Sorrows, Lancaster Avenue near Cathedral Cemetery, dedicated.
  • Renaissance Hall, in the Masonic Temple, dedication to the uses of Royal Arch Masons.
  • September 30. Parade of twenty-six commanderies of Knight Templars.
  • October 6. Cornerstone laid of Grace Chapel M.E Church, corner Master and Carlisle Streets.
  • October 7-8. National amateur regatta on the Schuylkill.
  • October 9. The returns of the election canvassers showed that the number of citizens entitled to vote is 164,510.
  • Cornerstone laid of Bethany M.E. Church, southwest corner of Eleventh and Mifflin Streets.
  • October 23. A locomotive and eleven oil cars were thrown off the track of the Greenwich branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Point Breeze, by running over a horse. The engineer, John Frew, killed.
  • October 26. Chapel of Tasker Street M.E. Church, corner of Snyder Avenue and Fifth Street, dedicated.
  • November 5. City ice boat No. 3 launched at Kaighn's Point.
  • November 6. Baptist Home for Old Women, Seventeenth and Norris Streets, opened and dedicated.
  • November 10. The State Centennial Supervisors adopted the plan of Collins & Autenreeth for the memorial building of the Centennial Exposition.
  • November 17. First flag on the grand flagstaff at League Island hoisted by the Secretary of the Navy, Hon. Geo. M. Robeson.
  • November 27. Thanksgiving Day, grand review of the First Division National Guards of Pennsylvania, by Governor Hartranft.
  • January 1. Fire at sugar refinery of McKean, Newhall & Borie, a Grange Place between Second and Third Streets; loss, $200.000.
  • January 29. New Olympic Theater, Market Street, south side below Thirteenth, destroy by fire; loss, $200.000. Two firemen were killed.
  • February 8. Miss Hage and Ms, Lee, two ballet dancers at Mortimer's Varieties (corner tenth and Callowhill Streets). burned by their dresses taking fire from a stove. Both subsequently died.
  • February 6. The Franklin Saving Fund Society adjudged bankrupt. Indignation meeting of depositors held same day at Assembly Building (S.W. corner Tenth and Chestnut Streets).
  • Fiftieth anniversary of the Franklin Institute celebrated at Musical Fund Hall.
  • February 13. The larger beer brewery of Henry Muller, Thirty-Second and Jefferson Streets, fell in from the weight of a great quantity of ice which was being stored in an apartment. There were twenty-eight persons in the brewery at the time; of this nine were killed, and eleven badly injured. Everything in the building was destroyed, the pecuniary loss estimated at $100.000.
  • February 18. Autopsy upon the bodies of the Siamese twins (Chang and Eng Bunker) finished at the College of Physicians and Surgeons.
  • February 27. First demonstration made against taverns and lager beer saloons in imitation of proceedings in Ohio and other Western States. About twenty women visited three or four saloons in the neighborhood of Susquehanna Avenue and Fifth Street, Sang hymns in front of these places and delivered prayers. None of the saloons closed.
  • March 5. Ropewalk of John P. Bailey & Co., Otsego and Morris Streets, burned; loss $20.000.
  • March 19. Fire at Insall & Dorey's spring factory, 1437 Hutchinson Street; loss $35.000.
  • March 24. Machine shops and other buildings at the Shipyard of William Cramp & Son, Beach and Norris Streets, burned; loss $175.000.
  • April 29. Steamship Mediator burned at Pier 19, Delaware Avenue below Callowhill Street; loss 250.000.
  • May 8. Boiler explosion at the Keystone Mills, Callowhill Street near Twenty-Fifth; two persons killed.
  • May 23. Sash-factory and planing-mills of Hazel & Co., north-east corner of eighth Street and Girard Avenue, burned; loss $25,000.
  • May 29. Fire al 11 North sixth Street, occupied by Edward Stern, printer; loss $20.000.
  • May 31. Eighteenth Street Chapel of M. E. Church, corner of Eighteen and Wharton Streets, dedicated.
  • June 3. Cornerstone laid of the addition to German Hospital, corner of Corinthian Street and Girard Avenue.
  • June 4. University Hospital Thirty-Fourth and Spruce Streets, dedicated by Governor Hartranft.
  • June 17. Edward Payson Weston, at the Chesnut Street Rink (Twenty-third and Chestnut Streets) commenced and effort to walk two hundred miles at the rate of fifty miles per day in ten hours per day. He accomplished it on the fourth day. Time, first day, 9h. 59m. 15s.; second day, 9h. 56m. 50s. Third day, 9h. 56m. 40s.; fourth day, 9h. 54m. 20s.
  • June 18-19. Regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Course, from the Falls Bridge to Rockland, one and half mills. Prize for four-oared shells won by Argonaut Rowing Association of Bergen Point, NJ Prize for pair-oared shells won by Nassau Boat Club, NY Prize for single sculls won by J.R. Keaton of the Harlem Rowing Association of New York.
  • June 24. Fete champetre at Belmont, West Park, under auspices of Women's Centennial Committee.
  • June 27. Regatta of the Amateur Rowing Association on the Schuylkill. Course, from Rockland and return, two miles. First prize won by Nereid; second prize, Lucilla.
  • July 1. Charles Brewster Ross, a boy four years old, son of Christian K. Ross, of Germantown, together with an elder brother, was carried off and kidnapped by two men. The older boy was released at Richmond and Palmer Streets, and return to his home, but the younger one was not heard from. Very large rewards were offered for his recovery, and the case was one which attracted attention all over the United States.
  • Zoological Gardens at Fairmount Park formally opened to the public.
  • Public announcement made that the Centennial Board of Finance had accepted the bid of Richard J. Dobbins for the erection of the Centennial buildings. The contract price for Memorial Hall was $972,595, according to specified dimensions, or maximum cost of $1,249,273, if the cubic capacity of the building shall be increased thirty per cent. The contract cost of the main Exposition Building, covering eighteen acres, was $1,236,000, exclusive of about $80,000 for grading.
  • July 3. Henry Loth's sewing machine factory, southeast corner of Broad and Wallace Streets, burned; loss, $35.000.
  • July 4. Cornerstone of Public Building laid at Broad and Market Streets. The building had been commenced long before that time,
  • Girard Avenue Bridge formally opened. Total length, 1000 feet; total width, 100 feet. The widest bridge in the world. Cost, $1,404,445.
  • July 16, The Athletic and Boston Baseball Clubs sailed for Europe upon a professional tour on the steamship Ohio.
  • August 4. Fire at mill, northwest corner of Germantown and Columbia Avenues; loss, $22,000.
  • August 5. Cornerstone laid of Memorial Baptist Church, northeast corner Broad and Master Streets.
  • August 25. Signor Pedanto made a balloon ascension from Windmill Island. At the office of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Fourth Street and Willings Alley, the aerostat struck a flagpole on the top of the building, which tore a hole in the balloon, causing the gas to escape. The balloon descended rapidly, whereby the persons in the car were injured.
  • September 1. Fire at James Wright's carpet factory, Twenty-third and Simes Streets; loss, $25,000.
  • September 5. Centennial celebration of the meeting of the First Continental Congress at Carpenters' Hall.
  • September 9. Steamship Abbottsford arrived with the members of the Athletic and Boston Baseball clubs on board.
  • September 26. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Course from Rockland, one mile up the river and return. Single scull prize won by J.B. McBeath, of Quaker City Club, time,16m. 10s; gigs,. Pennsylvaniaia Club, time 14m. 18s. Double sculls, Steele and Whitemar of Pennsylvania Club. Barges, Ione of Crescent Club, Ttime, 14m. 38 1/2s. Four-oared shells, Pennsylvania club, time, 9m. 15 3/4s.
  • October 1. Cornerstone laid of new building for the women's Medical College, corner of Twenty-First Street and North College Avenue.
  • October 11. Church of the German Reformed Salem congregation Fairmount Avenue below Fourth, dedicated.
  • October 18. Cornerstone laid of Roman Catholic Church of St. Agatha, northwest corner of thirthy-eigth and Bridge (Spring Garden) Streets.
  • October 27. F.H. G. Brotherton concluded, at 806 Green Street, the pedestrian feat of walking 1000 half-miles in 1000 half-hours, being 1000 half-hours of consecutive hours, which effort was commenced on October 6.
  • October 29. Falls of Schuylkill Brewery, belonging to Jacob Hohenadel, burned, loss $45,000.
  • November 2. Fire at glassworks of F.J. Cook, York and Thompson Streets; loss, $35,000.
  • November 12. Fast traveling on Pennsylvania Railroad from Jersey City to West Philadelphia depot, 1 hour 47 minutes, including two stoppages. From Philadelphia to Baltimore, 2 hours, 15 minutes. From Baltimore to Philadelphia, return, 2 hours, 13 minutes.
  • November 21. Manayunk and Roxborough inclined railway opened.
  • December 14. William Mosher and Joseph Clark, abductors of Charles Brewster Ross, shot and killed while attempting burglary at the residence of Judge Van Brunt, at Bay Ridge, Long Island.
  • February 8. Steam tug Hudson, cut through the ice and sunk in the Delaware.
  • March 13. First number of Col. Alexander K. McClure's paper The Times, published.
  • May 9. Fiftieth anniversary of the pastorate of Rev. Dr. John Chambers celebrated at his church, services lasting for one week.
  • July 21. Preliminary surveys for the improvement of the Independence Square begun.
  • July 30. Peoples' passenger Railway (Callowhill) opened for travel.
  • February 9. Fire at Keen & Coates Foundry, 943 North Front Street; loss $46,000.
  • February 15. Fire at 113-115 North Third Street; loss, $50.000.
  • February 27. Fire at Washington Butchers' Sons, meat packing establishment, 146-148 North Front Street; loss, $100,000.
  • June 7. Fire at John Brown & Sons' cotton a woolen mills, Eight and Tasker Streets; loss $43,000.
  • August 15. Fire at Perot's malt house , 310 Vine Street; loss $31.393.
  • August 24. J.B. Johnson, a professional swimmer of England, swam from the Lazaretto to Gloucester, about ten miles, in a contest with Thomas Coyle of Chester, PA., who gave up before he had swam more than half the distance.
  • September 13-22. Cricket tournament at Germantown. The picked twelve of Philadelphia defeated Canada twelve by a score of 231 t0 144. The British officers defeated Canada twelve by 353 to 290. The Philadelphia twelve beat the British officers by eight wickets; score, 282 to 281.
  • September 26. A dummy on the Frankford (Fifth and Sixth Street) railway, smashed by an excursion train from New York at the Harrowgate crossing of the connecting railway; five persons killed, and twenty injured.
  • October 4. Fire at Burgin & Sons' glass factory, Girard Avenue and Palmer Streets; loss, $20,000.
  • October 14. Mattress and furniture factory on Randolph Street above Oxford Street, burned; loss, $20,000.
  • German Hospital formally dedicated.
  • October 31. Fire al Carlton Woolen Mills, Twenty-third and Hamilton Streets; loss, $500,000.
  • November 10. J.F. Betz's malt house, St. John (American) Street below Callowhill, burned; loss, $20,000.
  • November 20. Market Street bridge over the Schuylkill destroyed by fire. Permanent bridge first opened for travel January 1, 1805; rebuilt and widened, 1850-51.
  • November 21. Moody and Sankey, famous religious revivalists, began a series of meetings in the old Pennsylvania freight depot, southwest corner of Thirteenth and
  • Market Streets.
  • November 30. South Street bridge opened to pedestrians.
  • December 2. U.S. Navy Yard at foot of Federal Street sold to Pennsylvania Railroad Company for $1,000,000.
  • December 8. Fire at William B. Thomas' barrel factory, Willow Street above Twelfth; loss, $20,000.
  • December 22. Ridge Avenue Farmer's Market, Ridge Avenue below Girard Avenue, opened for business.
  • The Franklin Institute and Academy of Fine Arts in 1869 memorialized Congress in favor of holding an International Exhibition to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. By act of Congress this was authorized March 3, 1871. Congress, on June 1, 1872, incorporated the Centennial Board of Finance with authority to receive subscriptions at ten dollars per share. The State of Pennsylvania gave $1,000,000 to the commission for the purpose of erecting a permanent building, since known as Memorial Hall, and the city of Philadelphia gave $1,500,000 with which were constructed Machinery Hall and Horticultural Hall. On July 4, 1873, the commissioners of Fairmount Park formally transferred to the Centennial Commission and the Centennial Board of Finance, for the use of the exhibition, two hundred and thirty-six acres of ground.
  • There were one hundred and ninety-four building erected. The main building were: Main Exhibition building, 1,876 feet long, 464 feet wide; cost, $1,600,000. Machinery Hall, 1,402 feet long, 360 feet wide; cost, $792,000. Horticultural Hall, 383 feet long, 193 feet wide; cost, $251,937.
  • Memorial Hall, intended to be an art gallery, permanent building, 365 feet long, 210 feet wide, the dome rising 150 feet above ground; cost, $1,500,000.
  • Agricultural Hall, a long nave, crossed by three transepts; nave, 820 feet long, and 100 feet wide; central transept 465 feet long and 100 feet wide; cost, $197,000.
  • The United States government building, built in the shape of a cross. Long nave, 400 feet long, 100 feet wide; cross transepts, 300 feet in depth, 100 feet wide; cost, $162,000.
  • Women's Pavilion formed by two intersecting naves, each 64x192 feet; cost, $40,000.
  • Foreign Government and buildings, etc.
  • The Centennial Exhibition opened on May 10, 1876, and closed on November 10, 1876. The total admissions were 9,910,966 persons. The exhibition was remarkably successful.
  • January 1. Grand celebration of the opening of the Centennial year, at the State House, by hoisting the grand Union flag, together with illuminations, ringing of bells, blowing of steam whistles and firing of cannon and firearms, at midnight, between December 31 and January 1. Immense concourse of people present.
  • January 28. Moody and Sanky's meetings at the old Pennsylvania freight depot, southwest corner of Thirteenth and Market Streets, closed. During the time they were in the city they held 210 meetings, and it was estimated that they were attended by more than one million and fifty thousand persons.
  • February 27. Main auditorium of Siloam M. E. Church, Otis Street above Thompson, dedicated.
  • March 6. First train of cars from Philadelphia to New York, over the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad (depot, American and Berks Street) passed through from city to city.
  • March 18. West End Mills, Sixty-seventh and Lombard Streets, burned; loss, $195,000.
  • March 26. East Montgomery Avenue M. E. Church dedicated.
  • March 28. New depot building of Twelfth and Sixteenth Streets Passenger Railway Co., Twelfth Street and Susquehanna Avenue, fell in, in consequence of heavy rains.
  • April 1. Municipal census taken by the police. Dwelling houses, 143,936; inhabitants, 817,448; males over twenty-one years, 226,070.
  • April 22. New building of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Broad and Cherry Streets, dedicated.
  • April 27. New York and Philadelphia Railroad between both cities opened by excursions.
  • May 1. Continental (horse) Railway opened.
  • May 3. New branch of the Reading Railroad to the Centennial grounds opened.
  • May 7. Roman Catholic Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Twentieth and Christian Streets, dedicated, the Empress of Brazil being present.
  • May 10. Opening of the Centennial International Exhibition of Industry, at the Centennial grounds, Fairmount Park, by the President of the United States, in presence of members of Congress, Supreme Court, Cabinet, and many other National, State and municipal officers, and over one hundred and fifty thousand people. The Emperor and Empress of Brazil were present, participating in the ceremonies which were grand and impressive.
  • May 26. John Hay's waste paper warehouse, northeast corner of Germantown Avenue and Master Street, collapsed from being overweighted with materials during alterations. Three persons were killed and four injured.
  • June 14. First passenger train run over Philadelphia and Newtown Railroad to Fox Chase.
  • July 3. Centennial service at Christ Church.
  • July 4. Centennial anniversary of Declaration of Independence.
  • Parade of volunteer troops from all parts of the Union; ;exercises in Independence Square, oration by William B. Evarts; poem by Bayard Taylor; Senator Ferry, President of U. S. Senate, presided. Emperor of Brazil and large number of distinguished visitors present; grand music by large chorus and orchestra. In the evening a grand display of fireworks was given in Fairmount Park.
  • Dedication of the Catholic T.A.B. Fountain in Fairmount Park.
  • Monument to Alexander von Humboldt, in Fairmount Park, unveiled.
  • Explosion of chemicals at drug store of Henry F Bucher, Passyunk Road and Moore Street. Four men killed.
  • Fire at Detwiler & Hartranft's Quaker City Flour Mill, Delaware Avenue above Laurel Street, Landell's soap works, lumber yard of Collins & Co., and B.F Taylor & Co., and Taxis' screwdock; loss, $90,000.
  • July 7 Fire, yarn mill of James Meadowcraft & Son, Emerald and Sergeant Streets: loss, $25,000.
  • Long centre span of the Penrose Ferry Bridge fell into the Schuylkill River.August 24 "New Jersey State Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Paid admissions, 56,325. Exhibitors, complimentary, etc., 8,709; total 65,034.
  • August 31. Prize fight at Pennsville, New Jersey, between Jimmy Weeden and Young Walker for $250.00 a side, won by Weeden. Walker died from the effects of his beating shortly after the fight was concluded. The captains of various boats and the Creedmoor Cutter, a barge, and others, the principal and accessories arrested and held by the Coroner of Philadelphia.
  • September 3. Fire at Mund & Albrecht's Farm (picnic grounds frequented principally by the Germans) Indian Queen Lane, Falls of Schuylkill. Property entirely destroyed; loss, $50,000.
  • September 6. Parade of Volunteer Firemen, embodying many of the old volunteer companies of Philadelphia, with companies from other parts of the Union.
  • September 14. "Massachusetts Day" at Centennial Exposition. Admission to main exhibition, 78,977; live stock show, 6,818; free admissions, etc., 12,075; total, 97,968.
  • September 22. A number of wooden buildings in Shantytown (in close proximity to the Centennial grounds) were town down by the police under the direction of Mayor Stokley.
  • September 25. "New York Day" at Centennial Exposition. Paying visitors at main exhibition, 118,719; at live stock show, 3,284; free admissions, 12,585; total, 134,588.
  • September 28. "Pennsylvania Day" at the Centennial Exposition. There were 274,919 persons in attendance.
  • October 1. Audience room of the Fifth Reformed Presbyterian Church (General Synod) York Street near Coral, dedicated.
  • October 2. Edwin Forrest Home, near Holmesburg, opened. "Instituted for the support and maintenance of actors and actresses decayed by age or disabled by infirmity."
  • October 3. Philadelphia, Newtown and New York Railroad sold at auction at the Merchants' Exchange for $10,000.
  • October 5. "Rhode Island Day" at Centennial Exposition. Total attendance, 100,946.
  • October 12. "New Hampshire Day" at Centennial Exposition. Total attendance, 115,422. Monument and statue to the memory of Christopher Columbus, procured by the Italians of Philadelphia, dedicated in Centennial grounds.
  • October 18. "Reading Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Total attendance, 138,874.
  • October 19. "Delaware and Maryland Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Total attendance, 176,407.
  • October 20. Monument statue in memory of John Witherspoon, signer of Declaration of Independence, dedicated in West Park.
  • October 21. Fire at George Griffith's shovel factory, Locust above Fifth Street; loss, $50,000.
  • October 22. Cornerstone laid of Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady of Visitation, Leigh Avenue and B Street.
  • October 26. "Ohio Day" and "Merchants' Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Attendance, 135,661.
  • October 27. "Vermont Day" at Centennial Exposition. Attendance, 108,080.
  • October 30. Girls' Normal School at Seventeenth and Spring Garden Streets, dedicated.
  • November 2. "German Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Attendance, 128,002.
  • November 7. "Women's Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Attendance, 87,859.
  • November 9. "Philadelphia Day" at the Centennial Exposition. Attendance 193,078. In the evening, display of fireworks.
  • November 10. The centennial Exposition was formally closed with appropriate ceremonies. During the 159 days that it was open the paying visitors were 8,004,274; free, 1,906,692. Total, 9,910,966. The free admissions were mainly those of exhibitors, attendants and employees.
  • January 1. The Supreme Court took possession of their new apartments, City Hall, Broad and Market Streets.
  • January 19. Fire at the flour mills of Detwiler & Co., 3042-44 Market Street; loss, $75,000.
  • January 20. Fire at Baeder & Adamson's glue factory, m Allegheny Avenue and Richmond Street; loss, $20,000.
  • Fire at sash and blind factory of Keller & Krouse, St. John (American) Street; loss, $30,000.
  • February 5. New fire station of Truck D, Union Street below Fourth, formally occupied by the company.
  • February 6. New police station at Girard Avenue and Vienna (E Berks) Street, 11th District, formally occupied.
  • February 22. Citizens of Philadelphia presented to John Welsh, president of the Centennial Exhibition Board of Finance, $50,000 in commemoration of his zealous and unselfish labors in promoting the success of the Centennial Exhibition. The money was transferred to the University of Pennsylvania for the perpetual support of "the John Welsh Professorship of History and English Literature.
  • February 23. Synagogue of the Hebrew Congregation Beth-el-Emeth, Franklin Street above Green, rededicated.
  • February 25. Fox's American Theatre, Chestnut Street above Tenth, with Rodger's carriage factory, and other buildings burned; loss, $300,000. One man killed.
  • February 26. Meeting of butchers at Institute Hall, Broad and Spring Garden Streets. Strong resolutions against the proposition that all the butchers shall have slaughtering done at the abattoirs.
  • March 10. Planning mill of Turner, Larrish & Co., Noble Street between Eleventh and Twelfth Streets, destroyed by fire; loss, $30,000.
  • March 21. Trial of steam passenger cars on the West Philadelphia (Market Street) P. R. W. Co. Seven dummy engines in use.
  • April 2. An exhibition of the powers of Elisha Gray's telephone at office of Western Union Telegraph Co., Tenth and Chestnut Streets. Music played at Philadelphia was heard in New York by an audience assembled at Steinway Hall.
  • April 4. Menagerie storage building and stables of Adam Forepaugh, Wister Street near Godfrey Avenue, burned; loss, $20,000.
  • May 1. Union Banking Co., Chestnut Street above Third, failed. Same day United States Banking Co., corner of Tenth and Chestnut Streets, failed.
  • May 10. Permanent Exhibition formally opened in Philadelphia by President Hayes and ex-President Grant. Admissions estimated at 100,000.
  • June 25. Cornerstone laid of new building of Central Presbyterian Church, on west side of Broad Street, north of Fairmount Avenue.
  • July 8. The new Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railway (narrow gauge) opened by an excursion of officers of the road and others.
  • July 16. Trial of the transmission of sound through Edison's vocal telephone at the Permanent Exhibition Building. Vocal music at the Central Station telegraph office, at Fifth and Chestnut Streets, was transmitted over the wires, and heard with great clearness at the Exhibition Building.
  • July 19. Fire at Swift & Courtney's match factory, 219 North Forth Street; loss, $45,000.
  • August 13. Swimming match on Delaware River between Thomas Coyle, of Chester and George H. Wade, of Brooklyn. Course from Red Bank to Gloucester, 4 miles. Race won by Wade. Time, 1 hour and 40 minutes.
  • September 17. Jefferson Medical College Hospital, Ransom Street between Tenth and Eleventh Streets, formally opened.
  • September 22. Great excitement among brokers and bankers in consequence of the discovery of an over-issue of stock of the Market Street Railway Co., which it was subsequently ascertained amounted to about 11,000 shares. John S Morton, President of the company, who with the Treasurer and Secretary had made the over-issue, resigned
  • the office of President, and also resigned his position as President of the Permanent Exhibition Company.
  • September 28. John S. Morton and others implicated, bound over to answer a charge of conspiracy to cheat and defraud.
  • The 101st Anniversary of the adoption of the old Constitution of Pennsylvania celebrated at the Hotel La Fayette (west side of Broad Street below Chestnut, now site of Land Title Building).
  • September 29. Fire at morocco factory of W. Schollenberger & Sons, S. W. Corner of Mascher and Putnam Streets; loss, $250,000.
  • September 30. New Roman Catholic Church of Sacred Heart, Third Street below Reed, dedicated.
  • Siloam Primitive Methodist Church, Otis (E. Susquehanna Avenue) and Moyer Streets, re-dedicated.
  • October 6. New Farmers' Market, N. .W corner of Broad Street and Columbia Avenue, opened for business.
  • October 19. First annual regatta of the Fairmount Rowing Association over the national course on the Schuylkill.
  • November 3. Fox's new American Theatre, Chestnut Street above Tenth (re-built after the fire) was opened for performances.
  • November 7. Fire at Randolph Mills, Randolph Street above Columbia Avenue, occupied by Weil & Sons, Harvey & Good, and others; loss, $50,000.
  • November 22. Fire at southwest corner of Ninth and Chestnut Street; loss, $100,000.
  • November 27. Farewell banquet to Hon. John Welsh, minister to England, at the Aldine Hotel., Public reception at the Academy of Fine Arts on the next day.
  • December 9. German Lutheran Church of Holy Trinity, Sixteenth and Tioga Streets, formally opened.
  • December 15. Fire at the building in which Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, at the southwest corner of Seventh and Market Streets; loss, $15,000, suffered by Simon & Co., trunk manufacturers, and Longacre & Co., wood engravers.
  • December 25. The Alhambra Theatre on Broad Street re-opened by John S. Clarke, under the title of the Broad Street Theatre.
  • January 1. William S. Stokley inaugurated for his third term as mayor of the city of Philadelphia.
  • January 11. Chatham Mills, Howard and Berks Streets, burned; loss, $50,000.
  • January 20. New iron bridge at Penrose Ferry, on the Schuylkill, opened for foot-passengers.
  • January 22. Excitement among dealers in morocco leather, caused by the failure of ten firms engaged in that trade.
  • January 23. John M. Armstrong, a music typographer, while on a visit to Camden, N. J., murdered. Coroner's jury at Camden found that Benjamin Hunter was guilty of the crime. Hunter, after a trial
  • at Camden, lasting twenty days, was convicted of murder in the first degree on July 3, 1878.
  • January 31. Fire at wholesale dry goods store of H. P. & W. P. Smith, 224-226 Chestnut Street; loss, $400,000.
  • February 2. Philadelphia, Newtown and New York Railroad formally opened for business.
  • February 10. Nine of the western arches of the South Street bridge feel. Loss estimated at $85,000.
  • February 14. Fire at the carriage factory of Jacob Rech, south-east corner of Eighth Street and Girard Avenue; loss, $12,000.
  • February 20. New building of the Kensington National Bank, Frankford and Girard Avenues, opened for public inspection. Business commenced Saturday the 23d.
  • March 11. The office of Prothonotary of the Supreme Court was removed from State House Row to the new Public Buildings.
  • March 16. Fire at the bedstead factory of Meyer, Tufts & Co., Richmond Street above Montgomery Avenue; loss, $15,000.
  • March 25. Fire at southeast corner of Fourth and Cherry Streets in the store of H. K. Wampole, extended nearly down to Arch Street; total loss, $750,000.
  • April 13. Steam dummy cars, after a trial of almost a year by the Market Street Railway Co., were withdrawn from service. Too expensive.
  • April 29. The gallery of Pompeiian views deposited with Fairmount Park Commission by John Welsh opened to the public in the Art Building, East Park.
  • May 6. Ridgway Library building and grounds, corner of Broad and Carpenter Streets, formally transferred to the Library Company of Philadelphia by Henry J. William, executor of the late Dr. James Rush.
  • May 10. Fire at phosphate manufactory on Venango Street, near the Delaware River; loss, $75,000.
  • May 16. Iron steamship State of California launched from the shipyard of William Cramp & Sons.
  • Hall of Moyamensing Lodge, No. 330, I. O. O. F. at Eighth and Reed Streets, dedicated.
  • Fire at Southwark Cotton and Woolen Mills, Moyamensing Avenue and Moore Streets; loss, $42,000.
  • June 8. Spring regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Course, Falls Bridge to Rockland Landing. Pair-oared prize won by University crew, time, 11.20; double sculls by Crescent Club, 10.12 1/4; four-oars by Crescent Club, 9.31.
  • First regatta of the Schuylkill Yacht Club. Course from Ellsworth street wharf, Schuylkill to Chester buoy and return. First-class, prize won by the T. B. Doyle; second-class, the Bently; third-class, the Vindex.
  • June 15. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Prizes for four-oared boats won by Crescent, time, 9.331/2; for four pair oars by University; double sculls and single sculls by Crescent; four-oared gigs by University; and six-oared barges by Crescent.
  • June 29. Western section of Brown Street River Market on Delaware Avenue, opened for business.
  • July 10. Explosion at the blast furnace of S. Robbins & Son, at Beach and Vienna Streets, by which seven persons were injured. John McChesney died. Two others died subsequently.
  • Rifle contest at Saenger Park (21st and Diamond Streets) between the Norristown Rifle Club and the Keystone Rifle Club of Philadelphia. Eight men on each side, ten shots each. Keystone, 342; Norristown, 339. Average, 423/8. Time, 1 hour.
  • August 1. Destructive rain and wind storm. The Coliseum market house (iron Building) Broad and Locust Streets, was struck by lightning.
  • August 5. River pirates attempting to rob the schooner L. Still-man of Great Egg Harbor, N. J., anchored in the Delaware, shot at by the master of the vessel. One thief killed and two wounded.
  • New American Theatre, Chesnut Street above Tenth, sold by the Sheriff for $75,000 to H.H. Morrel of New York.
  • August 15, Swimming match between T Butler, of Philadelphia and Robert Ward, of New York, from Bridesburg to Point Airy (southern end of Windmill Island, opposite Spruce Street in the Delaware river) distance, 5 miles. Won by Butler in 40 minutes.
  • September 2. Ground broken for the building of Eden M. E. Church, Leigh Avenue below Fifth Street.
  • September 5. Stalls in new (Zimmerman) market house, southwest corner of Frankford Avenue and Adams Street, sold and the market opened. (now site of Weisbrod & Hess brewery).
  • September 13. New Delaware River Market, at the foot of Brown Street, formally opened.
  • October 3. International cricket match at the grounds of the Germantown
  • Cricket Club between the Australian cricketers and a select team of Philadelphia players. The game was closed on Saturday, while unfinished, by the stumps being drawn. Score, Philadelphia, first innings, 196; second innings, 53 total, 249. Australians, first innings, 150; second innings, 56 total, 206.
  • October 4. The Continental Telegraph Company opened its line between Philadelphia and New York.
  • October 5. Second annual regatta of the Fairmount Rowing Association on the Schuylkill River, over the national course. Prize for single shells won by C. Hamilton in 11 minutes, 11-1/2 seconds; single shells, J. Schnall, 14 minutes , 46 1/4 seconds; double sculls, W. Tapper and C. Reitze, 12 minutes, 37 3/4 seconds; four-oared barges, Fairmount, 14 minutes, 10 seconds; six-oared barges, Washington, 10 minutes, 43 3/4 seconds.
  • Fall regatta of the American Rowing Club on the Schuylkill River below the dam, from Callowhill Street bridge to Chesnut Street bridge and return, estimated two miles. Prize for signal sculls won by W. Wood; four-oared barges, Atlantic, 18 minutes, 52 seconds; six-oared barges, Belmont, 15 minutes, 26 seconds; double-outriggers, won by the Eddie; single shell match, three miles, J. Meek, 12 minutes, 42 seconds.
  • October 7. Free drawing schools of the Spring Garden Institute formally opened at Broad and Spring Garden Streets.
  • October 12. Hero Glassworks of W. A. Leavitt, at Aramingo, Cedar, Gaul and Adams Streets, destroyed by fire; loss, $60,000.
  • October 20. Roman Catholic Church of St. Agatha, Spring Garden and Thirty-eighth Streets, dedicated.
  • October 21. New freight station of Pennsylvania Railroad Company opened at Thirty-first and Market Streets.
  • October 23. Great cyclone and wind storm. There was a great flood in the "Neck" which submerged the whole territory below Miffin Street from the Delaware to the Schuylkill. Loss of life, about ten persons, thirty injured. Properties destroyed, 4 church steeples blown down. Immense loss.
  • November 5. Edward Shippen school house, Cherry Street above Nineteenth, destroyed by fire; loss, $15,000.
  • November 9. Fire at ice house of Bergner & Engel Brewery, Thirty-second and Thompson Streets; loss, $150,000.
  • November 12. Fire at chair factory and lumber yard of Hutchinson, Nichols & Co., American Street above Susquehanna Avenue; loss, $10,000.
  • November 14. Rifle shooting contest at Saenger Park, Twenty-first and Diamond Streets, between Keystone Riffle Club of Philadelphia and Norristown Rifle Club, 100 yards, offhand. Score: Norristown, 354; Keystone, 345.
  • December 1. Norris Square M. E. Church, Mascher Street above Susquehanna Avenue, dedicated.
  • December 11. Offices of Department of Highways removed from Sixth and Chestnut Streets, and opened in the new public Building, Broad and Market Streets.
  • December 17. John S. Morton, formerly president and Samuel B. Hahn, formerly treasurer of the Market Street Passenger Railway Company, sentenced to pay a nominal fine, the costs of trial, and to undergo ten years imprisonment, for fraudulently issuing stock of the company.
  • December 30. Meeting of citizens of Twenty-third Ward, formerly of the township of Byberry and Moreland, at which it was resolved to petition the Legislature to separate that territory from the city of Philadelphia and annex it Bucks County.
  • January 6. Octavius V. Catto school for colored children, Lombard Street above Twentieth, formally opened.
  • January 6 and 7. Largest sheriff's sale of real estate ever known in Philadelphia. Nearly 700 properties were levied upon and advertised to be sold.
  • January 10. Benjamin Hunter, convicted of the murder of John M. Armstrong, music typographer of Philadelphia, hanged at Camden, N. J.
  • January 15. United States Centennial Commission met for the last time at the Continental Hotel, and received and adopted the final report of the committee on finance and accounts.
  • January 20. Cotton and wollen mills of John Brown & Son, corner of Eighth and Tasker Streets, burned; loss, $200,000.
  • February 8. Machinery Hall, Fairmount Park, originally built for the use of the Centennial Exhibition, and which cost the city of Philadelphia $634,867.48, was sold at auction to W. P. Allison & Son for $24,600. The building consisted of a main hall 360 feet wide and $1,402 feet long, and an annex 208x210 feet.
  • March 1. Cracker bakery of Walter G. Wilson & Co., 212-214 North Front Street, destroyed by fire; loss, $40,000.
  • March 10. The building formerly the Arch Street opera House, opened as "The Park Theatre," under the management of George K. Goodwin.
  • March 24. Fire at packing establishment of Washington Butchers' Sons, 146-148 North Front Street; loss $30,000.
  • March 25. British bark Tulchen, while being towed from Kaighn's Point, N. J., to Girard Point, capsized and sunk in twenty-two feet of water at the mouth of the Schuylkill.
  • March 31. Fire and explosion at Belmont Oil Works, Twenty-fourth and Miffin Streets. Two men burned to death; loss, $80,000.
  • April 6. Fire broke out in factory building, northeast corner of Race and Crown (Lawrence) Streets, extended to the building northside of Race Street; loss, $21,000.
  • May 15. The directories of the Philadelphia and Reading Railway Company announced that they had leased for a period of 990 years the North Pennsylvania Railroad to Bethlehem, with its connection, and the Bound Brook Railroad to New York, lease to date from May 1, 1879.
  • June 11. Lightning struck the oil canning shed of LaComte & Perkins, at Point Breeze, setting it in fire. The flames were communicated to several vessels moored at the wharves; loss, over $150,000.
  • June 14. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill Navy. Course from below the Falls Bridge to Rockland, one and a half miles straight away. Prizes as follows: Four-oared shells, won by Crescent Club, 9.30; two-oared shells, Philadelphia Club, 10.46; double shells, Quaker City, 10.48; four-oared gigs, College Club, 10.35; single shells, Pennsylvania Club, 10.47.
  • Steamer Wanderer, for New Orleans and Havana Line, launched from shipyard of Birely, Hillman and Streaker, foot of Montgomery Avenue.
  • June 20. Fire at factory building, Ridge Avenue below Master, G. W. Smith, furniture finishers; loss, $20,000.
  • June 24. Inter-collegiate regatta between the crews of Columbia and Princeton colleges and University of Pennsylvania, on the Schuylkill River. National Course, Falls bridge to Rockland, one and a half miles. Won by the University crew in 9.23.
  • June 27. Fire at southeast corner of Seventh and Cherry Streets, doing great damage to Hasting's gold leaf establishment, Stern's printing office, etc.; loss $20,000.
  • Steam boiler exploded in the planing mill of Alphas Wilt & Sons, Front Street, below Brown. Four persons killed and several injured.
  • July 17. fires at the stores 7-9 South Water Street; loss, $30,000.
  • July 31. Seventeenth and Nineteenth Streets Passenger Railway formally opened as a portion of the Continental Passenger Railway formally opened as a portion of the Continental Passenger Railway.
  • August 14. An excursion train on the Philadelphia and Atlantic (Narrow gauge) Railroad, came into collision with a freight train near Clementon; five persons killed and several injured.
  • August 28 and 29. International Cricket match at the Young American grounds at Stenton, between the Hamilton Club, of Hamilton, Canada, and the Young America Club, of Philadelphia. Score: Young America, first innings, 28; second innings, 50; total, 78. Hamilton, first innings, 74; second innings, 5; total, 79 with ten wickets to spare.
  • October 23. Match game of cricket between the Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire players of Draft's English professional team, reinforced by English players. Score: Nottinghamshire, first innings, 148.
  • September 25, 26, and 27. International cricket match at the grounds of the Germantown Cricket Club, near Wayne Station, between the Gentlemen of Ireland and a picked team of Philadelphia. Score: Irish Gentlemen, first inning, 58; second inning, 82; total, 140. Philadelphia, first and only inning, 149.
  • September 28. Return game between the Irish and Philadelphia Cricketers. One inning, Ireland 122; Philadelphia, 108.
  • September 30. Cricket match between the Irish twelve and fifteen of the Merion Club on the grounds at Ardmore, Score: Ireland, first inning, 138; second, 170; total, 308. Merion, first inning, 81; second, 130; total, 211.
  • Keystone wool and yarn Mill, Callowhill Street above twenty-fifth, destroyed by fire; loss $28,000.
  • October 2. Boat race on the Schuylkill between six-oared barges of Fairmount and Neptune Clubs. Course from Chestnut street bridge to the red buoy at Gibson's Point, three miles. Won by Fairmount in 19 minutes, 29 seconds.
  • October 4. Annual fall regatta of the Schuylkill Navy, National course, Schuylkill River. Prize for a single sculls won by W. B. Cobb, Pennsylvania Club, 11.2; double sculls, Vesper Club (no opponents); four-oared gigs, Malta, 9.531/4; senior singles, C.V. Grant, Philadelphia Club, 10.53; eight-oared shells, Undine, 8.55.
  • October 5. Cornerstone laid of new Roman Catholic Church of the Gesu, to replace church of the Holy family, Eighteenth and Stiles Streets.
  • First through train from Philadelphia to New York run from the Reading Railroad depot, Ninth and green streets, via the Bound brook railroad.
  • October 10, 11, and 13. International cricket match at Germantown Cricket grounds, Nicetown, between Daft's English professional eleven and fifteen selected amateurs. Score: English, first inning 149; second, 133; total, 282. Philadelphia, first inning, 70; second, 67; total, 137.
  • October 12. Cornerstone laid of new building of the German Evangelical Reformed Bethlehem Church, Blair and Norris Streets.
  • October 17. Cricket math between Draft's All-English professional eleven and Young America eleven at Stenton. Young America, first inning, 64; second, 47; total, 111. Draft, first and only inning, 171; second, 22 (when the game was stopped with the first wicket down); total, 170. Yorkshire, first inning, 51 second, 118; total, 169.
  • November 1. Fire at the grain storage house of Brooke & Harper, 1729-33 Market Street; loss $50,000.
  • December 4. The controlling interest in the Union Passenger Railway company, 12,600 shares, purchased by a combination, principally composed of officers and stockholders of the Continental passenger Railway Company, at $100.00 a share, (this was the nucleus to the formation of combinations, eventually forming the Philadelphia rapid Transit Company).
  • ridge Avenue Passenger Railway Company commenced to sell five tickets for the conveyance of passengers for 25 cents. Single fares remained at 6 cents.
  • December 8. Work commenced on dismantling and taking down the Coliseum Building, corner Broad and Locust Streets (site of Hotel Walton) in order to remove the same to Boston
  • December 8. Work commenced on dismantling and taking down the coliseum Building, corner Broad and Locust Streets (site of Hotel Walton) in order to remove the same to Boston.
  • December 16. Grand public reception of general U.S. grant upon his return to Philadelphia and the conclusion of his journey around the world. military and civic procession which required four hours and 40 minutes to pass a given point. It was 6-1/2 miles in length, and was estimated to have been participated in by 40,000 persons and seen by 350,000 spectators.
  • December 25. George Sheppard badly injured in Shackamaxon Street above Richmond, by oil of vitriol being thrown on him, as was alleged, by George Wood.
  • January 12. Brickmakers' Union formed at a meeting held at \federal Hall, Seventeenth and Federal Streets.
  • January 14. Fire at spring factory of John Scott, Newmarket and Pollard Streets, which also destroyed Jacob J. Plucker & Co.'s
  • furniture factory and damaged the furniture factory of S. Oetzel, J. Worthington's machine shop, and J. Buckley & Co.'s hub and spoke works. Loss, $55,000.
  • January 15. The Darby Plank Road from Forty-ninth Street to the county line passed into the possession of the city by purchase.
  • January 25. Fire at the establishment of Stephen S. Whitman & Sons, S. W. corner. of Twelfth and Market Streets. Loss, $70,000.
  • January 26. Twenty-two locomotive engines belonging to the Reading Railroad Company were seized at the Port Richmond depot by U. S. Internal Revenue Collector, by instruction from Washington, upon a claim of the U. S. Government for taxes on scrip issued by the company in 1878-79.
  • February 2. Fire at furniture factory of John A. Elbert, on Edward and Lydia Streets, above Hancock. Loss, $60,000.
  • Fire at Keystone Flour Mill, corner. of Leopard Street and Girard Avenue, occupied by Stetler & Co., millers. Loss, $25,000.
  • February 9. Fire at Clifton Mills, Berks Street between Hope and Howard Streets. Loss, $191,000.
  • Meeting a subscribers to a proposed bank, at which it was resolved that the institution should be organized with a capital of $600,000, under the title of "The Merchants' National Bank of Philadelphia."
  • February 19. Philadelphia Library building, N. E. corner. Fifth and Library Streets, closed.
  • March 8. Birth of a female elephant, said to be the first born in captivity, at Cooper & Bailey's London Circus and Menagerie stables, Ridge Avenue and Twenty-fourth Street.
  • March 25. The new Merchants' National Bank commenced business at the former building of the Provident Insurance Company, Fourth below Chestnut Street.
  • Stable of the Richmond branch of the Union Passenger Railway Company, Thompson and Norris Streets, burned. Loss $20,000.
  • April 1. Fire at N. W. corner. Twelfth and Noble Streets, factory occupied by J. Conaway & Co., manufacturers of umbrella frames. Loss, $100,000.
  • April 7. Fire at the tea and coffee store of John Lamont (an eccentric character) 51 South Second Street. Loss, $20,000.
  • April 11. Mrs. Elizabeth E. Goersen died at the house of her husband, 255 East Cumberland Street. Coroner's jury found that her death was occasioned by poisoning with arsenic, administered by her husband, Dr. Alfred G. F. Goersen. On the 19th of April Corner's jury also found that Mrs. Elizabeth F. Souder, mother-in-law of Dr. Goersen, who died on the 25th of March, was poisoned by him. Dr. Goersen was convicted of murder.
  • April 29. Under the name of Ridgeway Park, Smith's Island, in the Delaware opposite the city, improved with new buildings and other arrangements, was opened to the public as a place of resort.
  • May 17. Fire at Gardener's Continental Brewery, Twenty-first Street and Washington Avenue. Loss, $75,000.
  • May 21. Reading Railroad Company and Reading Coal and Iron Company suspended payment, causing great excitement.
  • June 4. Fire at Patton, Allison & Jones cotton-mill, Washington Avenue above Twelfth Street. Loss, $30,000.
  • June 16. New railroad to Atlantic City, via the West Jersey Railroad to Newfield, formally opened.
  • June 24. Fire at Nice's Sash Mill, Third and Marriat Streets. Loss, $100,000.
  • June 28. Inter-collegiate boat race for the Child's' challenge cup, on the Schuylkill River, between the crews of Columbia College, N. Y.; University of Pennsylvania, and Princeton, N. J., won by Columbia, beating the University 7 inches. Time, 9.043/4.
  • Fire at hosiery mills, Crease Street above Girard Avenue. Loss, $30,000.
  • July 4. Steamboat Argonauta, of the Ridgeway Park line, ran down a small boat near the foot of Otis Street. Kate Mahey and three children were drowned.
  • July 7, 8, 9. Eighth annual regatta of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen, national course, Schuylkill River. Prizes, single sculls, J. A. Whitaker, Pawtucket Club, R. I., 10.43; senior single sculls, F. J. Mumford, Perseverance Club, New Orleans, La.; double sculls, Pawtucket Club, R. I., 9.41; pair-oars, Gorman Bros, Albany Club, N. Y. 10.17; four-oared shells, Hillsdale Club, Mich., 8.53; six-oared shells, Mutual, Albany, N. Y., 8.51; eight-oared shells, Douglas, New York City, 8.53.
  • August 11. Excursion by congregation of St. Anne's Roman Catholic Church to Atlantic City by the West Jersey Railroad route, carrying about 1,300 persons. Collision between two sections of the train on the return trip at May's Landing, N. J. at 6:30 P. M. One person was killed outright. Thirty-two persons were scalded by escaping steam, of whom twenty-five subsequently died.
  • August 18. Arrival of the steam yacht Anthracite, claimed to be the smallest steam vessel that ever crossed the Atlantic. Length, 85 feet; breadth of beam, 16 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; tonnage, 28 tons.
  • August 25. Fire at the W. B. Thomas flour-mill, N. W. Thomas corner. Thirteenth and Noble Streets. Loss estimated at $200,000. William Miller, foreman of the mills, overwhelmed in the falling ruins and killed.
  • September 3. Fire at Marshall Bros.' Rolling Mill, Beach and Marlborough Streets. Loss $50,000.
  • September 6. Tenth anniversary of the Declaration of the French Republic celebrated at Rising Sun Park, Allegheny Ave. and Germantown Ave.
  • September 12. monument and bronze statue of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks dedicated at Mount Moriah Cemetery.
  • September 13-14. International cricket-match at the Nicetown field between twelve Canada and twelve United States players. Score, United States, first inning, 70; second inning, 168; total, 238. Canada, first inning, 83; second, 7; total, 90. There were six wickets down in
  • the second Canada inning when at night the stumps were drawn, and the game declared a draw, according to the rules.
  • September 15-16. Cricket at Ardmore between the Canadian players and the Merion Club. Score, Canada, first inning, 57; second inning, 85 total, 142. Merion, first inning 138; second, 6; total, 144, with eight wickets to go down.
  • September 20. The new Chestnut Street Opera House, formerly Fox's American Theatre, rebuilt and refurnished, opened for the first time, under the management of George K. Goodwin, with the drama of the Danicheffs.
  • October 4. The epizooty, or horse disease epidemic in the city , Large numbers of animals affected, but the disease much milder than was the case in 1872.
  • October 12. Stone flour mill, Mill Street, Holmelsbuth, totally destroyed by fire. Loss, $12,000. This mill was the oldest in Pennsylvania, having been erected in 1697.
  • October 17. New Roman Catholic Church of St. Joachim, Frankford, dedicated.
  • October 22. Fore at the yarn factory of Dixon & Roberts, Canal Street above Lawrence Street and Girard Ave., also occupied by Alexander & John McConnell, morocco manufacturers. Loss, $86,000.
  • October 27. Cornerstone laid of East Baptist Church, Hanover Street above Girard Avenue.
  • November 3. New House of the Good Shepherd, Thirty-fifth and Silvertown Ave., Roman Catholic, first occupied by the sisterhood.
  • November 7. St. Peter's P.E. Church, Germantown, was consecrated, being out of dept.
  • Fourth Moravian Church, Hancock Street above Dauphin, dedicated.
  • December 23. Fire at B. Crawford's tannery, Sixth Street east side) above Thompson. Loss, $25,000.
  • January 2. Delaware River frozen over from shore to shore. Persons passed over the ice to Camden; skating lasted for some days.
  • January 5. New building of Beneficial Savings Fund society, S. W. corner twelfth and Chestnut Streets, opened for business.
  • January 14. Fire at Columbia Shoddy Mill, Columbia Avenue and Fifth Street. Loss, $15,000.
  • January 18. Fire in the carpet-yarn mill of James Whitaker, Trenton Avenue and Sergeant Street. Loss, 16,000.
  • January 19. Malt-Mill of G. F. Rothacker, Thirty-first and Master Streets, burned. Loss, $30,000.
  • January 31. Beth-Eden Baptist Church, N. W. Corner Broad and Spruce Streets, totally destroyed by fire. Loss, $60,000.
  • February 1. Fire in the six- and eight-story factories, 212-224 Carter Street. Loss, $200,000.
  • February 2. Waltzing against time by Julian and Constantine Carpenter, at Carpenter's Dancing Hall, Thirteenth and Chestnut Streets, who waltzed for sixteen and a half hours without stopping. "The best time on record."
  • February 6. Tioga M. E. Church, corner Nineteenth and Tioga Streets, dedicated.
  • February 10. The ice above Columbia Bridge, Schuylkill River, started, but formed a gorge at the bridge, backing up the water as far as Manayunk. The river rose from 15 to 18 feet, flooding the mills and other buildings on the banks of the Schuylkill and overflowing Ridge Avenue, stopping horse-car traveling.
  • February 16. First train run over the new elevated railroad of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, on Filbert Street to Broad, with an excursion-party composed of members of the American Institute of Mining Engineers.
  • February 20. New Oxford Presbyterian Church, cor. Broad and Oxford Streets, built on the site of one destroyed by fire December 3, 1879, dedicated.
  • February 22. Pythian Temple, Pine Street below Third, built for the order of the Knights of Pythias, opened for inspection.
  • March 6-7. Farewell services ices at Trinity M. E. Church, Eighth Street above Race, the congregation having abandoned the building and united with the Sixteenth Street M. E. Church.
  • March 9. Fire at Belmont Oil Works of Works of W. L. Elkins & Co., Long Lane near Twenty-fourth and Mifflin Streets. Loss, $80,000.
  • March 21. Retail Grocers' Association formed at a meeting held at Association Hall.
  • March 24. The trustees of the University of Pennsylvania accepted an endowment of $100,000 from Joseph Wharton for the foundation of the Wharton School of Finance and Economy in the University.
  • March 26. Iron steamship Perseus, built for Iron Steamship Company of New York, launched from Cramp's Shipyard.
  • April 5. Farmers' bone and fertilizer works and ninety boat houses of the Southwark yacht Club destroyed by fire. Loss, $110,000.
  • April 7. Iron steamboat Pegasus, built for Iron Steamboat Company of New York, launched from Cramp's Shipyard.
  • April 9. Iron Steamship Caraccus, built for New York and Venezuela line, launched from Cramp's Shipyard.
  • June 1. Steam-boiler in dye-house of Thomas Gaffney & Co., 2430 Collins Street, exploded, causing the death of three, and injuring five others. Loss, $31,000.
  • Children's Sanitarium at Point Airy (Windmill Island) opened for the season.
  • All Saints Roman Catholic Church, Brown and Bockius Streets, Bridesburg, struck by lightning and damaged by fire.
  • June 11. First annual meet of Bicycle Club at West Park and road race to Ardmore, in which 67 wheelmen participated.
  • June 18. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill Navy; 25 contesting crews. National course, 1-1/2 miles, straight away. Prizes as follows: Juniors singles, Vesper Club, 11.33 1/2; senior singles, Quaker City Club, 10.25 1/4; pair oars, Undine, 10 40 1/2; junior four-oared gigs, Vesper, 10.03; four-oared shell,, College, 8.58 3/4; double sculls, Vesper, 10.13; senior gig, Vesper, 9.48; six-oared barge, College, 9.39 1/4; eight-oared shells, College, 8.33.
  • June 24. A syndicate represented by the People's (Callowhill Street) Railway Company and others bought 15,309 shares of stock in the Germantown City Passenger Railway Company, being a controlling interest.
  • July 6. Inter-collegiate boat race for the Child's' challenge cup on the Schuylkill between the crews of Princeton College and University of Pennsylvania. The University came in ahead, the Princeton being a quarter of a mile behind. The cup was awarded to the Princeton crew upon the ground that one of the crew of the University Club was ineligible.
  • July 16. Annual regatta of the American Rowing Association on lower Schuylkill. Course from Callowhill Street bridge to Market Street and return. Prizes for six-oared barges won by the Riverside; four-oared, Pythias; double sculls, the W. J. Temple crew; single scull, John Hobbs.
  • July 20. Cornerstone laid of the new building of Heidelberg Reformed Church, cor. Nineteenth and Oxford Streets.
  • Fire at Pequea Cotton and Woolen Mills, Pennsylvania Avenue and Twenty-second Street. Loss, $160,000.
  • July 27. The Lombard and South Street Passenger Railway leased to the West End and Angora Passenger Railway Company.
  • July 28. The trotting mare Maud S. undertook, at Belmont Park, to exceed her previous performance of one mile in 2.10 1/2. She trotted three heats as follows: First, 2.12; second, 2.13 1/4; third, 2.12 1/2. This was stated to be the quickest time on record for three consecutive one-mile heats.
  • August 1. Eighth Street Theatre, Eighth Street below Vine, opened for the first time. Address, music and the play "Little Emily."
  • August 5. Four colored men appointed substitutes on the city police by Mayor King, they being the first in Philadelphia.
  • August 6. Iron screw steamship Allegheny, built for the Merchants and Miners Transportation Company, launched from the shipyard of William Cramp & Sons.
  • August 10. A fast train on the Camden and Atlantic Railroad made the trip from Camden to Atlantic City in 76 minutes.
  • August 22. Meeting of colored citizens at Liberty Hall, Lombard Street above Seventh, to return thanks to Mayor Samuel G. King for his course "in recognizing the just and equal claims of colored men in his appointments to the police force."
  • August 26. Lager-beer brewery of Henry Mueller, Thirty-first and Jefferson Streets, burned. Loss, $75,000.
  • August 29. Fire at Globe Mills, Germantown Avenue below Girard Avenue, occupied by Schatchard & Hoffman, silk-yarn spinners, and the Midnight Yarn Co. Loss, $15,000.00.
  • September 3. Steamship Berkshire for Merchants and Miners Transportation Company, launched at shipyard of William Cramp & Sons.
  • September 14. Fire at the Union Hub, Spoke and Wheel Works of Fitler & Dubois, cor. Otter and Leopard Streets. Loss, $30,000.
  • September 15. Swimming-match for the championship of the Delaware from Blockhouse to Ridgway Park, a distance of 7-1/2 miles; 8 contestants. First prize won by Dennis F. Butler; second, Duke Marr, of Schuylkill; third, George Bird, of Atlantic City; fourth, Thomas Coyle, of Chester.
  • September 19. Intelligence of the death of President James A. Garfield, who died at Elberon, N. J., at 10.35 P.M., received before midnight.
  • September 20. Public buildings, churches, stores, factories, etc., draped in mourning colors. In the evening all the theatres and places of amusement were closed.
  • September 26. Day of humiliation and prayer in consequence of the death of President Garfield. General suspension of business.
  • David Kalakaua I, King of the Sandwich Islands, arrived in the city and took lodgings at Continental Hotel.
  • September 27. Cornerstone of Cookman M. E. Church,. Corner Twelfth and Lehigh Avenue, laid.
  • September 29. Fire at stables of Adams Express Company, Twenty-second Street below Market. Loss, $10,000.
  • Swimming-match on the Delaware River, for the championship and a purse of $400 between Joseph Marrow and Dennis F. Butler. Course, from the red buoy at Chester to Ridgway Park, 15 miles. Upon reaching the old Greenwich Point docks, a distance of about 12-1/2 miles, Butler succumbed, and the prize was awarded to Marrow. Time, 3.50m. This was said to be the longest swim yet accomplished in the United States.
  • October 1. Linseed-oil works of Grove & Brothers, at Greenwich Point, First Ward, burned. Loss, $50,000.
  • International cricket match commenced at the grounds of the Germantown Club, near Nicetown, between Alfred Shaw's English professional team and twelve amateurs of Philadelphia, selected from the Young America, Merion, Germantown and Girard Clubs. Scores: Englishmen, first inning, 227; Philadelphians, first inning, 126; second, 47.
  • October 7. International cricket match at the grounds of the Germantown Club, near Nicetown, between Shaw's professional team and eighteen Americans chosen from Philadelphia, New York and
  • Boston clubs. Score: Englishmen, first inning, 114; second, 166. Americans, first inning, 71; second, 77.
  • October 12. Fire at the Randolph cotton and woolen mill, occupied by Charles H. Landenberger, Randolph Street above Columbia Avenue. There were thirty-eight workman and girls in the building, all of whom were cut off from escape by the rapid progress of the flames. Nine were killed by jumping from the windows or burned to death while in the building, or died afterward from their injuries; thirteen were seriously maimed or injured; sixteen escaped. Loss by the fire on the building, $10,000; on stock and machinery, heavy.
  • October 18. BY vote of 18,463 shares in favor to 3,501 against the proposition, the stockholders of Germantown Passenger Railway (Fourth and Eighth Streets) resolved to leave their road and franchises to the People's Passenger Railway (Callowhill Street) for 999 years at a maximum rental of $4.50 per share, or nine per cent. on the capital stock.
  • Steamship City of Puebla, 2,900 tons burden, for New York and Havana line, launched from shipyard of Cramp & Son.
  • October 24. Fire at the stationary store of William F. Murphy's Sons, Chestnut Street above Fifth. Loss, $25,000.
  • November 7. The disease called "pink-eye," or epizooty, affecting horses, made its appearance in this city, and continued about three weeks. Probably ten thousand horses belonging to passenger railway companies, etc., were affected, but few fatally.
  • November 27. Thomas E. Conaty and Owen Burns instantly killed while riding on a car on Fourth Street above Master by the pole of a steam fire-engine drawn by runaway horses.
  • December 3. Chestnut Street first illuminated with the electric light (forty-nine lamps) from the Delaware to the Schuylkill.
  • December 5. New Broad Street Station of Pennsylvania Railroad Company, connected with the elevated railroad at Market and Broad Streets, opened for business with the regular running of passenger trains.
  • January 16. Telegraph line of Bankers' and Merchants' Telegraph Company, from Philadelphia to New York, first opened for business.
  • January 26. Keystone hub, spoke and wheel works, Charles Scott's railway car spring factory, and N. H. Harned's silk fringe factory, New Market Street above Laurel, destroyed by fire. loss estimated at $125,000.
  • March 18. Iron steamship Valencia launched from shipyard of William Cramp & Son, for New York and Venezuela Line. Dimensions, 260 feet long, 34.6 feet beam, 22 feet deep. Engines, 900 horsepower, 1,800 tons.
  • Directors of union Passenger Railway Company resolve to adopt the cable-motor system for propulsion of their cars on Columbia Avenue branch from Twenty-third Street to East park entrance.
  • March 19. Cornerstone laid of German Roman Catholic Church of our Lady of the Nativity, at Allegheny Avenue and Belgrade Street.
  • March 23. The boiler of the tug-boat Henry C. Pratt, at Pier No. 8, South Wharves, exploded, killing five persons and totally destroying the boat. The tug-boat Ella, lying near by, caught fire and was destroyed. Station of Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railroad burned and adjoining property damaged. loss, $20,000.
  • Last rail of the River Front Railroad laid on Delaware Avenue and thereby complete railroad connection made between the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks at Greenwich point and the tracks of the same road and the Reading Railroad at Kensington and Port Richmond.
  • March 25. Fire at cork manufactory of C. N. Rossel, Third Street above Callowhill; adjoining buildings damaged. Loss, about $45,000.
  • March 29. Store-building of Jacob Rorer & Son, Old York Road, Branchtown, totally destroyed by fire. Loss $30,000.
  • Ground broken for new armory for First Regiment infantry, National Guards Pennsylvania, southeast cor. Broad and Callowhill Streets.
  • April 1. Fire at Philadelphia Sewing machine Company's works, N. W. cor. Thirteenth and Buttonwood; property of R. Moorehouse damaged. loss, $25,000.
  • April 8. Philadelphia Recreation Park, Ridge Avenue and Twenty-fourth Street, opened for sports with a game of baseball.
  • April 9. Armory of Third Regiment National Guards of Pennsylvania, N. E. cor. Twelfth and Reed Streets, opened with religious services, Bishop Stevens, of P.E. Church, officiating..
  • April 19. Cornerstone of the armory building for First Regiment National Guards of Pennsylvania laid at Broad and Callowhill Sts. by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania with Masonic ceremonies, a military parade, review, and an oration. Reception in the evening at the Academy of Music.
  • April 22. Mill buildings, Sophia St. between Edward and Van Horn, occupied by Isaac Casson & Co., machinists, Joseph Weiss, and Roher & Noell, furniture manufacturers, destroyed by fire. Loss, $30,000.
  • April 29. Four-oared gig race between the classes of the University of Pennsylvania, National Course, Schuylkill River. Distance, 1-1/2 miles. Sophomores, 9 min. 22 sec.; Seniors, 9 min. 24 sec.; Juniors, 9 min. 39 sec.; Freshman time not taken. The Sophomores' time was faster by 9 seconds than any previous 4 oared gig-time on the course.
  • May 16. Composing-rooms and foundry of the Public Ledger lighted for the first time by means of the Edison incandescent electric light.
  • June 6. Spruce and Pine Streets Passenger Railway cars commenced to run for five-cent fares to Fairmount and Gray's Ferry from Delaware Ave.
  • June 13. Fire at round-house of Philadelphia and Atlantic City (narrow gauge) Railroad, Bulson St., Camden. Seven locomotives destroyed. Loss, $100,000.
  • June 17. Spring regatta of Schuylkill Navy; twenty-nine entries. National Course, 1-1/2 miles straight away. Prizes as follows: Junior singles, to West Philadelphia Club, 12.14 1/2; Senior singles, to Quaker City, 11.15 3/4; four-oared shells, College, 10.16 1/4; pair-oars, West Philadelphia, 11.44 3/4; Junior four-oared gigs, College, 10.40 3/4; Senior four-oared shells, College, 10.31 1/4; six oared barges, Vesper, 10.40 3/4.
  • June 20. Lombard and South Street, and Spruce and Pine Street Passenger Railway Companies (five-cent fare roads) began a system of exchanges for six cents over both roads, between West Philadelphia, Zoological Garden, Delaware Ave. and Dock St. and Exchange, Fairmount Park and Gary's Ferry.
  • June 20. Lombard and South, and Spruce and Pine Street Passenger Railway Companies (five-cent fare roads) began a system of exchanges for six cents over both roads, between West Philadelphia, Zoological Garden. Delaware Ave. and Dock St. and Exchange, Fairmount Park and Gray's Ferry.
  • June 23. Inter-collegiate boat-race for the childs' challenge cup, on the Schuylkill River between the crews of Princeton College and University of Pennsylvania. National Course, 1-1/2 miles straight away. Won by the University of Pennsylvania by two or three lengths. Time, 9 min. 32 sec.
  • June 24. At a special meeting of the stockholders of the Camden and Atlantic railroad Company, resolution adopted in favor of the purchase of the interest of William Massey in the Philadelphia and Atlantic City (narrow gauge Railroad Company for $500,000, which included stock, first, first-mortgage bonds, claims for interest, floating debt track, motive-power and rolling stock, worth at par and full value $824,807.57, payment to be made in bonds of Camden and Atlantic Railroad. Stock vote in favor of purchase, 13,057 shares; against purchase, 312. Subsequently (July 26) the Chancellor of New Jersey granted an injunction prohibiting the sale and transfer as contrary to law.
  • July 1. Auction-house of M. Thomas & Son, 139 and 141 South Fourth St. totally destroyed by fire. Loss, $20,000.
  • July 14. Fire at malt-house of Berger & Engel's Brewery. thirty-second and Thompson Sts. Loss, $20,000.
  • July 26. Stockholders West End Passenger Railway Company, by a vote of over 6,000 shares to 3,000, agree to consolidate their company with Lombard and South Streets Passenger Railway Company. Same day Court of Common Peas granted a preliminary injunction to restrain the consolidation.
  • August 3. Excitement in business circles in consequence of the discovery of extensive forgeries and frauds by Charles M. Hilgert, sugar-refiner, refinery, Lawrence St. Below Girard Ave., estimated to amount to $ 1,000,000. Hilgert absconds.
  • August 20. Roman Catholic Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, at Allegheny Ave. and Bellgrade St., dedicated.
  • August 22. Eighth General Convention of the American St. Cecilia Society for the culture of Catholic church music assembled at St. Peter's roman Catholic Church, Fifth and Girard Ave.
  • August 24. Iron steamship San Pedro, built for Central Pacific Railroad Company launched at shipyard of William Cramp & Son. Length, 350 feet; breadth, 42 feet; depth, 30 feet carrying capacity 3,500 tons.
  • September 1. Warrant issued for the arrest of Major Ellis P. Phipps, superintendent of the Almshouse, on a charge of defrauding the city out of $5,000 by a fraudulent warrant. Phipps entered bail to appear before a magistrate, and then absconded. Subsequently large quantities of goods and supplies belonging to the almshouse were found on premises in which Phipps resided.
  • September 2. Boat-race for a champion flag for barges between the Falls of Schuylkill and George W. Mallison barge clubs; four oars and coxswain. National course 1-1/2 miles straight away. Won by Falls of Schuylkill Club. Time, 10 min. 30 sec.
  • September 15. Public reception of Chief Engineer Melville and Seamen Noros and Nindermann, survivors f the Jeanette Arctic expedition, at Continental hotel.
  • September 18. Ellis P. Phipps arrested at Hamilton, Ontario.
  • September 19. First railroad car lighted by electricity arrived at station of Pennsylvania railroad Company, being also the first using this light in American in American.
  • September 20. Sanitarium (Point Airy) closed. During the season there were received and made comfortable there 36,860 children.
  • September 28. Fire at candy manufactory of Philip Wunderle, New Market St. above Pegg. Loss $40,000.
  • October 4. President and directors of the People's Passenger Railway Company, (Callowhill Street) , which also controlled the Germantown, Fourth and Eighth, Girard Avenue and Green and Coates Street lines, resigned, and Charles J. Harrah, who had obtained the controlling interest of the stock, was elected president, with a new board of managers.
  • Buildings in Rising Sun Park, Germantown Road at. Rising Sun Lane, destroyed by fire. Loss, $11,000.
  • October 8. New edifice of St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Reed St. below Ninth, consecrated.
  • Cornerstone laid of new Roman Catholic hospital of St. Agnes, corner broad and Mifflin Streets.
  • October 12 and 13. International cricket -match between the Australian eleven and the Philadelphia eighteen at Nicetown grounds. Score: Philadelphia, first inning, 82; second inning, 76. Total 158. Australia, first inning, 106; second inning, 53. Total, 159, with nine wickets to spare.
  • October 16. At Hamilton, Ontario, Judge Sinclair decided that Ellis P. Phipps, formerly steward of the Philadelphia Almshouse, was subject to extradition on charge of forgery. Phipps' counsel appealed.
  • Freight and passenger station of Philadelphia and Atlantic City (marrow-gauge) Railroad at Pier 8, South Wharves, destroyed by fire, also steam-tug, Major, belonging to the company. Steam-tug Argus, with some adjoining shipping, considerably damaged. Loss estimated at $40,000.
  • October 24. Landing Day. Bi-centennial celebration. A vessel representing the ship Welcome, bearing as passengers persons representing William Penn and other Friends, came up the river, followed by a grand procession of steamboats and tugs.
  • October 25. Trades' Day. Procession including persons engaged in different industries.
  • October 26. Festival Day.
  • October 27. Military Day.
  • December 5. Arrott's mill, N. W. Corner Coral and Taylor Sts., destroyed by fire January 31, 1881, having been rebuilt, reopened.
  • Arrott's mill, N. W. Cor. Coral and Taylor Sts., occupied by Joseph Greer, cotton and woolen manufacturer, Jaggard & Jones, Henry Grant, Stead Bros. And Robert Beatty, yarn spinners, burned. Loss, $115,000.
  • Fire at Rebman & Ruhland's iron foundry, Twenty-second and Master Sts. Loss, $25,000.
  • December 6. Great excitement in the southern part of the city in consequence of the discovery that a number of graver had been robbed of the dead in Lebanon Cemetery for Negroes, and that the bodies had been carried to a medical college.
  • December 20. Goldsmith's Hall, Library St. East of Fifth, totally destroyed by fire. Occupants, E. G. Haehnlen & Co., dealers in chamois skin; E. C. Markley & Sons, printers; A. C. Farley & Co., manufacturing stationers; Lehman & Bolton, Lithographers; Custom House and note-brokers, lawyers, etc. Loss, $350,000.
  • December 25. Joseph Jarvis, police-officer, stabbed severely, while in the discharge of his duty, at Leopard St. And Girard Ave., by William Rusk, with whom at the time was Jacob Rusk (twin brothers). The two escaped to Trenton, New Jersey, where, having learned that officers of the law were in pursuit of them, they committed suicide by drowning.
  • January 3. Bucks and Montgomery County Farmers' Market opened in building some years abandoned, formerly erected for market-house purposes, at S. E. Cor. Of Sixth St. And Columbia Ave.
  • January 26. Underground electric light apparatus on the Thompson & Houston plan went into operation for business purposes on Market St. Between Seventh and Eleventh Sts.
  • January 29. New freight-station of Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Shackamaxon St. And River-front Railroad, open for business
  • January 30. James F. Brown, ex-storekeeper in the Almhouse, charged with forgery and conspiracy with Ellis P. Phipps, ex-steward, to cheat and defraud the public, was found guilty.
  • Fire at 2540-256 N. Broad St., occupied by Leve, Knowles & Co., J. Allen & Co., E. H. Graham & Co., flour and grain merchants, Edmund Hill & Co., machinists, and E. W. Siegeman & Co., dealers in agricultural implements. Loss, $20,000.
  • February 5. Furniture manufactory of Julian Kraan, 942 N. Ninth St., No. 914 Broad Street, formally opened.
  • March 14. New building of the Homeopathic Hospital for children, No. 914 Broad Street, formally opened.
  • March 24. United States steel-plated monitor Terror launched from the shipyard of Cramp & Sons. Length between perpendiculars, 250 feet, 3 inches; depth of hold, 14 feet, 8 inches. Keel' laid October 2, 1874.
  • April 7. Cable-motor branch of Union Passenger Railway, Columbia Ave., from Twenty-third St. To the Park, commenced regular operations.
  • The iron steam pleasure yacht Atlanta, built for Joy Gould, of New York, launched from the shipyard of Cramp & Sons. Length from knighthead to taffrail, 230 feet, 3 inches; beam, 26 feet, 4 inches; depth, 16 feet; rigged with three masts. No. 246.
  • April 10. Warrant for the extradition of Maj. Ellis P. Phipps to Philadelphia, signed by the governor-general of Canada.
  • April 13. Maj. Ellis P. Phipps, extradited from Canada, brought back to the city and lodged in the county prison.
  • April 14. Fire at the plumber's metal-works of C. A. Blessing, Montgomery Ave. bel. Sixth St. Loss, $70,000.
  • April 26. Fire at the Arch Street Opera House, by which the interior was burned out. Loss, $18,000.
  • April 28. Four-oared gig-race between the classes of the University of Pennsylvania, national course, Schuylkill River. Distance, 1-1/2 miles. Juniors, class of '84, 9 min., 15 5/8 sec; Seniors, '83, 9 min., 33 sec.; Freshmen, '86, 9 min., 33 sec.; Freshmen, '86, 9 min., 30 sec. Medical class time not taken. The Junior time was 6 1/8 sec. faster than any before made on the river by four-oared gigs.
  • May 3. Iron steamship Alameda, built for the Oceanic Steamship Company, San Francisco, launched at the shipyard of Cramp & Sons.
  • Fire at S. E. cor. Germantown Ave. and Master St., occupied by D.F. Rawle, flour dealer; John Richardson, furniture manufacturer; Montague & White, hosiery; Walton Ritter, cotton goods. Loss, $23,000.
  • May 4. Maj. Ellis P. Phipps, tried for forgery, committed as an officer of the Almhouse, found guilty in the court of Quarter Sessions and sentenced, June 30, to five year's imprisonment, at hard labor.
  • May 6. Cornerstone laid of new Roman Catholic Church and school of St. Edward the Confessor, N. E. cor. Seventh and York Sts.
  • New chapel of Trinity M. E. Church, Fifteenth and Mount Vernon Sts., dedicated.
  • May 13. Fire at 1512-16 Spring Garden St., occupied by North American Smelting Works; Pennsylvania Brass Works; D. W. Bing, foundry and machine shops; D. B. Birch, miller; Fayer, cigar-moulder, and James Kerr, manufacturer. Loss, $35,000.
  • May 22. Fire at saw and planning mill and steam packing-box factory, Marshall Sr. above Girard Ave., occupied by W. H. Howard, Williwar & Yiest and William Stone. Loss, $11,500.
  • May 27. Cornerstone laid of Mount Airy Presbyterian chapel, Germantown Ave. and Mount Pleasant St.
  • June 12. Cornerstone laid of infirmary attached to Presbyterian Home for Widows and Single Women, Fifty-eighth St. and Woodland Ave.
  • Ground broken for Cohocksink M. E. church, S. W. cor. Seventh and Norris Sts.
  • June 15. Inter-collegiate boat-race for the Childs challenge cup on the Schuylkill River between the crews of Princeton College and the University of Pennsylvania. National course, 1-1/2 miles straight away. Won by the University of Pennsylvania by two clear lengths. Time 9.311/5 minutes.
  • June 23. Spring regatta of Schuylkill Navy, National course, Schuylkill River, 1-1/2 miles straight away. Prizes, Junior single scull to Vesper Club, time, 10.19; Senior singles, Malta, 10.271/2. Pair-oared shells, West Philadelphia, 11.121/2. Junior four-oared gigs, Malta, 9.18. Senior four-oared shells College, 8.39. Double sculls, Cresent, 9.101/2. Six-oared barges, Malta, 9.423/4.
  • July 1. Henry Disston Memorial M. E. Church, Tacony, dedicated.
  • July 19. At 12 o'clock M. the telegraph operators of the Western Union Telegraph Company, to the number of two hundred and forty, struck and left their work-a movement which was general with the operators of that company all over the United States at the same hour. The strike lasted until August 17th, when the members of the Brotherhood were officially informed by their officers, "The strike is a failure. All the members who can return to work immediately."
  • July 23. The direction taken by the cars on the Thirteenth and Fifteenth Streets Passenger Railway reversed, running up Thirteenth St. and down Fifteenth.
  • August 7. Fire at stable and ice-house of Knickerbocker Ice Company, Willow Street Wharf; thirty-three horses and four mules burned to death. Loss, $35,000. Reading freight depot, adjoining, damaged.
  • Fire at chemical works of Hance Bros. & White, N. W. cor. Marshall and Callowhill Streets. Loss, $28,000.
  • August 8. Exhibition of "walking on the water" on the Delaware River by C. D. Fort. He wore shoes of light cedar. Course, from Walnut St. Wharf to Ridgway Park. In consequence of a strong tide, which carried the walker far out of his course, the time required to reach the goal was two hours.
  • August 22. Collision in the Delaware River, off Point Airy, between the ferry-boat Dauntless, of the Gloucester line, and the steam-yacht Emma A. Kline. The latter was sunk, and William Young, drowned.
  • August 29. Fire at wollen-mill, N. W. cor. Cumberland and Third Sts., occupied by Gilmour & Morris, finishers; Lee & Bowers, woolens; Robert Laycock, woolens; Garner & Co., worsted; Joseph P. Murphy, shawls, etc. Loss, $50,000.
  • August 30. Accident on Philadelphia and Atlantic City Narrow-Gauge Railroad, near Pleasantville, New Jersey, caused by defect in a switch. Cars overturned, twenty-eight persons seriously injured.
  • September 3. William J. Menow shot and killed on Front St. above Poplar by Mrs. Emily Bickel, who claimed to be the wife of Menow.
  • September 12. Steamboat Mosses Taylor, of the Bridesburg and Tacony line, sunk at Bridesburg Wharf.
  • September 17. The new Arch Street Opera House, Arch St. west of Tenth, rebuilt after being burned, opened by Rice's Comic opera Company.
  • September 19. Saw and planing mill, Norris and Richmond Sts., occupied by Jesse W. Taylor & Sons, and Henry Bradshaw, hardwood goods, burned, and adjoining property damaged. Loss, $30,000.
  • Fire broke out in the lumber yard of James Gill, 1168 N. Third St., which spread and destroyed nearly the whole block of buildings bounded by Gill's lumber yard, Eagle Iron Works of Hoff & Fontaine, and from fifteen to twenty dwelling houses, shops and other buildings. Loss estimated at $75,000.
  • September 19. Workman commenced laying the cable road of the Union Passenger Railway Company on Columbia Avenue east of Twenty-third Street.
  • September 20. Philadelphia and Atlantic Railroad (narrow-gauge) sold at public sale at Camden, N. J. and bought by G. W. R. Kercher for the Reading Railroad Company.
  • September 24. New Central Theatre, on site of old Grand Central Theatre, Walnut St. above Eighth, opened. Front, 80 feet; depth, 135 feet, height to the cornice, 58 feet; auditorium, 76 feet deep; stage, 74 feet wide, 40 feet deep; height of rigging-loft, 76 feet; proscenium opening, 28 feet square. Seating capacity (orchestra, orchestra circle, balcony and gallery), 2,600.
  • New hall of Philadelphia Turn Verein, 433 and 435 N. Sixth St., dedicated.
  • September 29. Saw and planing mill, Willow between Eleventh and twelfth Sts., property of the assignees of William B. Thomas and occupied by J. J. Crout & Son, sash, blind and door manufacturers, and Henry A. Hunsincker, planing mill, burned. Loss, $20,000.
  • First annual meeting of the Pennsylvania division of the League of American Wheelmen at Fairmount Park, followed by the bicycle races at the Gentleman's Driving Park. About four hundred wheelmen in line.
  • October 1. Filemyer's brewery, 2527 N. Broad St., partly destroyed by fire. Loss, $15,000.
  • Reception of the Athletic Base Ball Club after its return from the West, where it had won champion pennant of the American Base Ball Association. Parade participated in by base ball clubs, yacht clubs, social clubs and other organizations.
  • October 8. Improvements in Franklin Square having been finished it was opened to the public and illuminated for the first time with electric lights.
  • October 24. The Letitia house, the cottage of William Penn. built in 1682, which was the first State House of the providence and was the oldest mansion in the city, having been removed from Leticia Court to Fairmount Park, was formally presented to the park Commissioners on behalf of the Bi-Centennial Association of Pennsylvania.
  • November 10. Iron steamship San Pablo, built for the Pacific Improvement Company, Launched from shipyards of William Cramp & Sons. Length, 350 feet; width, 42 feet; depth, 29 feet; engines, 2,000 horse-power; carrying capacity, 4.000 tons.
  • November 17. Fire at the sheds of the American Line Steamship Company at Christian St. Wharf. Cotton and other merchandise intended for shipment burned, also the tugboat Palls, some hosting floats, lighters and other vessels. Loss estimated at $120,000.
  • November 18. The new eastern standard of time adopted by the railroad companies of the eastern division of the country went into operation at noon. By resolution of City Councils, the public clocks were set thirty-six seconds faster than the current time, that being the time of the seventy-fifth meridian and the difference at Philadelphia.
  • November 28. The Fences of Carpenter St. and on Washington Ave., on the line of Fifteenth ST., which blocked up travel by reason of the occupancy of the ground by the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad Company, taken down.
  • January 1. New Hall of the Improved Order of Red Men, 928 Race St., formally opened.
  • January 15. Fire at hosiery mill of J. R. Bridges & Co., 1347 N. Front St. Loss $11,000.
  • January 21. New post-office building at Ninth and Chestnut Sts., opened for the first time to the public, a session of the United States Circuit Court being held there.
  • January 26. Perseverance Woods Works of Mahlon Fulton, Ninth St. above Oxford, totally destroyed by fire, loss $75,000.
  • January 27. Farewell Services in Cohockink M. E. Church, Germantown Av. above Columbia Av., building then abandoned by the congregation.
  • January 28. New post office, Ninth and Market Sts., put in use by the opening of the Money Order Department.
  • February 6. Workshop of the Phillips Underground Electric Cable Manufacturing Company, Willow St. above Twelfth, destroyed by fire; four firemen injured. Loss, $27,500.
  • February 16. Fire at the flour warehouse and depot of E. Lathbury & Co., Vine St. above Broad. Loss, estimated , $60,000. The western wall fell on February 17th, crushing in adjacent buildings on Vine St. and Leeds Ave., and killing two men, one of them being a firemen.
  • February 22. New armory of the First Regiment Infantry, Cor. Broad and Callowhill Sts., formally opened.
  • Hall of St. Michael's T. A. B. Society, Germantown Ave. above Columbia Ave. dedicated (formerly Cohocksink M.E. Church).
  • February 29. Fire in the laboratory of the chemical works of Powers and Weightman, extending from Brown to Parrish St., and from Ninth to Knox St. Loss, estimated $200,000.
  • March 6. Fire at the oil-cloth works of George W. Blabon & Co., Nicetown, destroying the coating, grinding and printing buildings. Loss, $150,000.
  • March 15. Fire at spice manufactory of A. Colburn & Co., Broad St. above Arch. Loss, $75.000.
  • March 31. The first trains run on the Schuylkill Valley branch of the Pennsylvania R. R., from Broad Street station to Bala, Philadelphia city.
  • April 7. New city government organized. William B. Smith inaugurated as Mayor; James R. Gates elected president of Select Council and Charles Lawrence president of Common Council.
  • Fire at malt-house of Frederick Fischer, Thompson St. west of thirty-second. Loss, $55,000.
  • May 7. Fire at the Philadelphia home-made bread and biscuit bakery of George W. Jones, 1429-1431 N. Twelfth St. Loss, $16,000.
  • May 11. Cornerstone laid of monastery of the Redemptorist Fathers of St. Bonifacius' Church, Hancock and Diamond Streets.
  • May 12. Stockholders of the West Philadelphia Passenger Railway Company ratified a lease of their road to the Philadelphia Traction Company for nine hundred and ninety-nine years, on a contract to pay each stockholder ten dollars per share annually, in half-yearly payments.
  • New Schuylkill Valley branch of the Pennsylvania P. R. Company formally opened as far as Manayunk.
  • May 14. Iron side-wheel steamer Hero, built for service on the Orinoco River, South America, launched form the yard of the America Shipbuilding Company, Port Richmond. Length, 110 feet; beam, 22 feet; depth of hold, 8 feet.
  • May 18. West Tasker Street Presbyterian mission chapel, Eighteenth and Tasker Sts., dedicated.
  • June 4. Iron steamship Eureka, built for the Morgan Line; between New York and New Orleans, launched from the shipyard of William Cramp & Son. Length, 350 feet; breadth of beam, 42-1/2 feet; depth of hold, 32-1/2 feet; engine, 1800 horse-power.
  • June 14. Collision on the Camden and Amboy R. R. near Ashland; two trains going in opposite directions on the same track ran into each other. Eight persons killed and nine badly wounded.
  • June 15. Spring regatta of Schuylkill Navy National Course; 1-1/2 miles straight away. Prizes: Junior sculls West Philadelphia Club, 10 m. 39-1/2 s.; Senior sculls, Pennsylvania, 10 m. 17-1/2 s.; pair-oar shells, West Philadelphia, 10 m. 38-1/4 s.; ;light four-oared shells, Crescent, 9 m. 46-1/2 s.; Junior four-oared gigs, Pennsylvania, a.m. 30 s.; Senior four-oared gigs, Pennsylvania, 9 m. 1 s.; six-oared barges, Malta, 9 m. 23 s.; eight-oared shells, University, 8 m. 12-1/2 s.
  • June 17-19. Tournament of the Quaker City Bicycle Club for all wheelmen in the United States and Canada commenced at Jumbo Park, Broad and Dickinson St.
  • June 18. Fire at Carr & Crawley's hardware and malleable iron works, Ninth and Jefferson Sts. Loss, $45,000.
  • June 19. Sixth inter-collegiate boat race for the Childs challenge cup, between the crews of Princeton College, New Jersey, of Cornell University, New York, and of the University of Pennsylvania. Flat-Rock course, on the Schuylkill; 1-1/2 miles straight away. Won by the University of Pennsylvania by half a length. Time, 7 m. 6-1/4 seconds.
  • June 20. Second race between the trotting-horse Scotland and John S. Prince on a bicycle at Jumbo Park; 10 miles. Won by Prince in 33. Minutes and 35-1/4 seconds.
  • June 29. Closing exercises at Tabernacle Presbyterian Church, cor. Of Broad St. And Penn Square, the building having been sold by the congregation.
  • June 30. Stockholders of the Union Passenger Railway Company at a special meeting agreed to lease their road to the Philadelphia Traction Company for nine hundred and ninety-nine years.
  • July 10. Eight-oared boat-race for the Sharpless challenge cup over the National Course, Schuylkill River, 1-1/2 miles. Won by the Columbia Boat Club, of Washington, D. C., in 8.06-3/4, being 5-1/4 seconds faster than any previous record.
  • July 17. Ground broken at N.E. cor. Susquehanna Av., and Twentieth St. for the hospital of the Woman's Homeopathic Association.
  • August 1. The old Chestnut Street skating rink, N. W. Cor. Twenty-third and Chestnut Sts., occupied by John Wanamaker for the manufacture of furniture and for storage purposes, and Phelan's lumber-yard, Twenty-third St., burned, together with considerable property on the south side of Chestnut between Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Sts. Loss, $160,000.
  • August 4. Machine-shop, store-room and pattern-loft of Baldwin Locomotive Works, Broad and Buttonwood Sts., partially burned. Loss, $150,000.
  • August 10. At 2:09 P.M. an earthquake shock, followed by another was felt in the city, accompanied by a rumbling sound. Buildings were shaken, bells rung, sashes rattled, doors sprung, various articles in some places thrown off of the shelves and tables, and people prostrated. The time of continuance of the shock was estimated at from 4 to 8 seconds.
  • August 13. Fire at drying-room of Theodore Morganstern's dye-house, Third and Huntingdon Sts. Loss, $35,000.
  • August 15. At Belmont Park the trotting-horse Jay-Eye-See, on a trial with the intention of excelling the former record of a mile in 2.1, trotted one heat in 2.1-1/4. Phallas, with the intention of beating his former record of 2.13-3/4, trotted one heat in 2.13 1/4.
  • August 20. Most Rev. P. J. Ryan, D. D., LL. D., archbishop of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, installed at the Cathedral by bishops and clergy of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • September 2. International Electrical Exhibition, under the auspices of the Franklin Institute, formally opened by Mayor William B. Smith and Governor Robert E. Pattison. Main Exhibition Building bounded by Lancaster Ave., Thirty-second and Thirty-third Sts. Front on the avenue, 283 feet; towers at the corners, 60 feet high; main roof central Gothic arch, 100 feet span, with two smaller arches 30 feet span. There were annexes, principal among which was the old Pennsylvania Railroad Station, on the east side of Thirty-second St. With railroad sheds and other buildings. Exhibition closed October 11th. Visitors, 285,000.
  • September 4. Councils passed resolutions directing the superintendent of electrical department to notify all telegraph, telephone, and electrical-light companies operating in city to remove their overhead wires, in compliance with ordinance of June 13, 1882, and place the same under ground before January 1, 1885.
  • September 12. Saw-mill of Bonta & Fenderich, Nos. 1063-1067 Germantown Ave., Loss, $15,000.
  • September 13. Annual regatta of the Fairmount Rowing Association on the National Course, Schuylkill River. Huhn challenge cup won by N. Hayes; time, 10.03-1/5. Four-oared shells won by the Hayes crew, 9.38-1/2; six-oared barges, Walsh crew, 10.34.
  • September 14. Cornerstone laid of new parochial building of St. Vincent de Paul's Roman Catholic Church, Germantown.
  • Cornerstone laid of new building for Monumental Baptist Church, Forty-first above Chestnut St.
  • September 15. Fire at wood carpet factory of J. W. Boughten & Co., Willow St. below Thirteenth. Loss, $50,000.
  • Forepaugh's Dime Museum, Eighth St. Below Vine, opened for the first time.
  • September 18. Bronze equestrian statue of Major General John Fulton Reynolds, by John Robers, sculptor, unveiled on the northern front of the new City Hall.
  • September 20. Fire at repairing-shop of W. D. Rodgers & Co.'s carriage-works, Tenth and Chestnut Sts. Loss, $50,000.
  • September 21. Chestnut Street Dime Museum opened in the old Masonic Hall building, Chestnut St. Above Seventh. Closed October 29th.
  • September 23. Annual convention of the National Council of the Order of United American Mechanics, at Elks' Hall, Eleventh and Chestnut Sts.
  • September 25. Penn National Bank commenced business in its new building, S. W. Cor. Seventh and Market Sts.
  • September 26. New building of the P .E. Church of the Crucifixion, Bainbridge St. above Eighth, dedicated.
  • September 29. Centennial celebration of the foundation of Freemasonry in the United States among colored persons by the establishment of African Lodge at Boston, Mass. Parade of Grand and Master Masons' Lodges of fourteen States and a reception.
  • October 1. New grounds of the Philadelphia Cricket Club, Wissahicken station, Schuylkill Valley Railroad, formally opened.
  • October 5. Cornerstone laid of Roman Catholic Church of St. Leo, cor. Keystone and Unruh Sts., Tacony.
  • Track of the Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railroad between Camden and Atlantic City changed from narrow gauge to standard gauge.
  • October 13. Collision of trains on West Jersey Railroad, Camden. One man killed and six injured.
  • October 21. Fire at oil-refinery of Crew, Levick & Co., 111 and 113 Union St. Loss, with damage to adjoining buildings, $30,000.
  • November 23. St. Mark's German Reformed Church, Fifth St. above Huntingdon, rebuilt, rededicated.
  • Fire at furniture manufactory of W. T. Richardson, 1204-1210 Frankford Ave. Loss, $15,000.
  • November 24. New Line of People's passenger Railway Company, via Susquehanna Ave., from Eighth to Twenty-second St., and by way of Islington Lane and Twenty-third to Norris St. and east on Norris to Germantown Ave., on Fourth St., to Walnut, and Eighth St., to Susquehanna Ave., opened for travel.
  • December 9. Fire at 526 and 528 North St., occupied by Scott Paper Company (Limited), Edwards & Docker and Henry P. Heppe, paper-bag manufacturers, and George Miller & Son, confectioners. Loss, $60,000.
  • December 10. Fire in furniture-factory of Clark Bros. & Co., 239, 241, 243 Levant St. Communicated to adjoining properties on Levant St. And west side of Second St. Loss, estimated, $145,000.
  • January 8. New monastery of Redemptorist Fathers attached to Roman Catholic Church of St. Boniface, Diamond St., Norris Square, dedicated.
  • January 26. Cable passenger railway of the Philadelphia Traction Company went into operation on Columbia Ave. and Master St.
  • January 29. Fire in livery stable of Charles S. Smith and John D. Cooper, 716, 718 and 720 Marshall St., with injury to adjoining buildings. Thirty-four horses burned to death, a large number of carriages and sleighs destroyed, with other property. Estimated loss, $35,000.
  • February 12. Insane department of Philadelphia Almshouse, Blockley, totally destroyed by fire; twenty-four lives lost.
  • February 16. High-tide in the Delaware River. Delaware Ave. was flooded from Callowhill to Chestnut St. The water in some places entering first floor of stores. Kaighn's Point ferry-house flooded and a portion of Eighth Ward submerged. Freshet on the Schuylkill, water 6 feet above ordinary stages.
  • February 19. Fire on Chestnut St. east of Second, north side, which destroyed or greatly damaged adjoining properties.
  • February 21. Fire at 504 and 506 Market St., occupied by Ruth, Bennett & Co., china and glassware; S. A. Rudolph, paper; Joseph I. Meaney, boots and shoes, with some damage to adjoining buildings. Loss, estimated, $100,000.
  • March 29. Parish building of Trinity P. E. Church, Forty-second St. and Baltimore Ave., dedicated.
  • April 2. John L. Sullivan and Dominick McCaffrey, professional pugilists, who had arranged for a contest at Industrial Hall, arrested for violating the laws in reference to prize-fights, and bound over each in $5,000 to answer for conspiracy, and in $5,000 to keep the peace.
  • April 22. Repair-shops of Pullman palace Car Company, Forty-first St. and Pennsylvania R. R., burned. Loss, $150,000.
  • April 26. Malt-house of Continental Brewing Company, Twenty-first St. and Washington Ave., burned. Loss, $50,000.
  • May 9. Fire at station and stables of Knickerbocker Ice Company, Noble St. and Delaware Ave., nine horses and mules burned. Loss, $25,000.
  • May 10. Cornerstone laid of new St. Luke's Evangelical Lutheran Church, at Seventh St. and Montgomery Ave.
  • May 12. Fire at planning-mill of A. H. Higham & Sons., Nos. 1043-1053 East Cumberland St. Loss, $12,000.
  • May 24. Services in new P. E. Church of the Annunciation, Twelfth and Diamond Sts.
  • Cornerstone laid of Roman Catholic convent of Immaculate Heart of Mary, adjoining St. Teresa's Church, Broad and Catharine Sts.
  • Closing services at P. E. Church of Evangelists, Catharine St. above Eighth, before tearing down the building.
  • May 28. Explosion of benzine and fire at the furniture-store and manufactory of Henry Vehmeyer, S. W. cor. Second and Market Sts., with damage to hat-stores of Henry Kayser and Evans & Betts, adjoining. One lady passing by in the street killed by the falling walls, and two persons injured. Loss, $60,000.
  • May 29. Shackamaxon Bank, cor. Frankford Road and Norris St., failed in consequence of the allowance and payment of heavy over-drafts upon the funds.
  • May 31. First appearance of the cicadas, usually called "Seventeen-year locusts," in Washington Square.
  • June 13. New cable of the Traction Company, on Columbia Ave. between Twenty-third St. and East Park, put into operation.
  • June 17. Lard-oil works of Washington Butcher's Sons, Moore St. above Sixth, totally destroyed by fire. Loss, $120,000.
  • June 19. Fire at Farmer's Western market-house, Twenty-first and Market Sts., used as a depot for the sale of Bradley's Chicago beef. Loss, $10,000.
  • Seventh intercollegiate boat-race for the Childs cup, between Cornell University, New York, and the University of Pennsylvania. Course, Shawmont, above Flat Rock, on the Schuylkill, 1-1/2 miles straightaway. Won by Cornell by a length and a third. Time, 8 m. 51 s.; Pennsylvania, 8 m. 54 s.
  • June 27. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill Navy course, 1-1/2 miles straightaway; 21 entries. Prizes: Junior single, Bachelor Club, 11 m. 50-3/4 s.; senior single, Pennsylvania; four-oared gigs, Pennsylvania, 10 m. 24-1/4 s.; pair-oared shells, West Philadelphia, 11 m. 32-1/4 s.; senior four-oared gigs, Pennsylvania, 10 m. 23-1/4 s.; senior four-oared shells, College, 9 m. 37-3/4 s.; double sculls, Pennsylvania, 10 m. 28-1/2 s.; eight-oared shells, Malta, 8 m. 54 s.
  • July 3. Mayor Smith signed the ordinance, which had previously passed Councils, authorizing the construction of the Baltimore and Philadelphia and the Schuylkill River East Side railroads within the city.
  • July 7. William H. Bumm, George W. Bumm and Samuel P. Milligan, late teller of Shackamaxon Bank, bound over on the charge of conspiracy to defraud the bank.
  • July 9. Eight-oared boat-race for the Sharpless challenge cup. National course, Schuylkill river, 1-1/2 miles; 5 entries. Won by Fairmount Rowing Association of Philadelphia, beating Columbia, of Washington, D. C., by two-thirds of a length. Time, 8 m. 32s.
  • July 12. East Montgomery Avenue M. E. Church, rebuilt, reopened.
  • July 14. Walls of boiler-house of Star Mill, Mascher and Jefferson Sts., fell in. One person killed; nine injured.
  • Ninety-sixth anniversary of destruction of the Bastile, celebrated by French societies and citizens at Renz Park.
  • July 18. Fire in operating-room of Western Union Telegraph Company, N. W. cor Tenth and Chestnut Sts., destroying all the wires there. Loss, $20,000.
  • July 23. News of the death of Gen. U. S. Grant, at Mount McGregor, N. Y., received at Philadelphia at 8.12 A. M. The State House bell was tolled sixty-three times, one stroke for each year of his age. Immediately flags were hoisted at half mast in all parts of the city. The Mayor's office was draped with mourning, and emblems of woe were displayed at public and private offices, stores, factories, dwellings and other buildings.
  • Cornerstone laid of the new building of Young Maennerchor Vocal Society, N. W. cor. Sixth and Vine Sts.
  • August 3. Heavy rains at intervals, with sharp lightning and thunder from 11.35 A. M. to 9:50 P.M. About 3.30 P.M. a tornado of great force crossed the river Delaware from Gloucester Point. Three large buildings in the Neck at the Pennsylvania salt-works were entirely prostrated, and other property in the neighborhood was damaged. The course of the wind was nearly north by east. The tornado crossed the Delaware to New Jersey. The steamboat Major Reybold, of the Salem Line, and the Peerless ferry-boat, of Gloucester line, were struck by it in the river, had all their upper works, pilot houses and cabins carried away, and the pilot of the Reybold was drowned. At Kaighn's Point the storm took the shore and pursued a northwardly course, by way of Front, Second and Third Sts., to Federal and Linden Sts., extending eastward to Fourth and Fifth Sts., and then upward to Cooper's Point where again crossing the Delaware, it struck the Port Richmond coal-wharves, at the foot of William St., passed to the north to the neighborhood of Harrowgate Lane and Kensington Ave., where its force was spent. In Camden large factory-buildings were thrown down or greatly damaged. The round-house of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company was totally demolished and locomotives damaged. Dwelling-houses, stores, etc., were unroofed or the walls blown in; trees in great numbers were thrown down; 400 buildings were damaged. In Kensington similar destruction took place. Houses were partially blown down, walls blown in and roofs taken off, with other damage; 150 buildings in this part of the city were damaged. The value of property destroyed was immense. In the city there were 3 lives lost and 38 persons injured; in Camden 4 were killed and 48 injured. In Camden the damage to real estate was estimated at $500,000, in Kensington, at $250,000. The value of personal property destroyed was impossible to compute. The course of the tornado was from 200 to 300 yards in width. In the afternoon there was a heavy flood in the Schuylkill. At the Falls the water, rushing down from the streets and descending to Ridge Ave. rose on the road 7 feet, carrying away small houses and fences, flooding cellars and the first stories of mills and buildings.
  • August 8. Day of funeral solemnities of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in New York observed with due solemnity throughout the country. The State House bell was tolled from 10 to 12 o'clock A.M. and bells of churches and public buildings. There was a general suspension of business throughout the city.
  • August 9. Fire at the Richmond paper-mill of Alexander Balfour, corner of Brabant and Tioga Sts. Loss, $22,000.
  • August 17. Explosion, supposed to be by dynamite, on the steamboat Samuel L. Felton, of the Wilmington Line, shortly after leaving Chestnut St. Wharf. About 175 passengers were on board. Eleven or twelve persons were injured, one of whom afterward died. Damage to the boat estimated at $4,000
  • September 14. Temple Theatre and Egyptian Musee, Old Masonic Hall building, Chestnut St. between Seventh and Eighth Sts., opened for the first time, with the comedy of "Sealed Instructions."
  • September 19. International cricket-match, between the "Gentlemen of England" and "Gentlemen of Philadelphia." Result: Philadelphia, 200, second inning, 178, total 378; Gentlemen of England, first inning, 147, second inning 122, total 269.
  • September 25 and 26. Second International Cricket game at Nicetown. Gentleman of England first inning, 293, second inning, 317, total 510; Gentlemen of Philadelphia, first inning, 147, second inning, 120, total 267.
  • September 29. Industrial Art School under control of the Board of Education, opened in Hollingsworth schoolhouse, Locus St. above Broad; 150 pupils.
  • October 8. Robert White attacked and killed, by the elephant Empress at winter-quarters of Forepaugh's circus and menagerie, Lehigh Ave. and Edgemont St.,
  • December 3. New hall of young Maennerchor Musical Society N.W. corner Sixth and Vine Sts. dedicated
  • New gymnasium of the University of Pennsylvania formally opened.
  • December 6. Consecration of new building of St. Luke's Lutheran Congregation, at Seventh St. and Montgomery Ave.
  • December 7. At the winter quarters of Forepaugh's menagerie, Lehigh Ave. and Edgemont St. the Nubian lion, Prince, escaped from his cage and attacked the elephant, Bolivar. He was disabled by a blow from the trunk of the latter, who finished by tramping upon the lion's body.
  • December 16. Fire in five-story building, 224 Carter's Alley below Exchange Place, occupied by Morrell & Bros., printers and bookbinders, Electric Motor Supply Company, Newman & Ergen, shirt manufacturers. Loss, $60,000.
  • December 24. Cornerstone laid of Girard Avenue Farmers' Market cor. Ninth St., and Girard Ave., 198 ft. on Girard Ave, by 194 ft. on Hutchinson St.
  • January 10. Tugboat James Kelly caught fire off mouth of Pennypack Creek. Loss, $5,000. Fire consumed the whole block of buildings between Emerald and Letterly, Taylor and Coral Sts., Thirty-first ward.
  • January 13. Tug William G. Boulton, Capt., Peterson, sunk by ice on Fourteen-Feet Bank lightship, Delaware River.
  • January 16. A majority of the stock in the People's Passenger Railway (Callowhill Street) Company, which was the lessee of the Fourth and Eighth, Green and Coates, Girard Avenue and Norris and Susquehanna roads, sold to a syndicate composed principally of stockholders of the Lombard and South Streets, P. R. W. Company, and reorganized by the latter.
  • January 20. Fire and explosion at the oil and lamp-fixture establishment of R. J. Allen, Son & Co., 115 Arch Street. The flames spread to premises of King, Son & Co. and the Riverside Oil Company, Nos. 113, 117 and 119. One person was killed by the explosion. Loss, $50,000.
  • January 25. Tenth National Bank (new) cor. Columbia Ave. and Camac St. (below Broad), opened for business.
  • January 26. Great fire on Arch St. west of Seventh, which commenced in the five-story Morris building, Nos. 715, 717 and 719, occupied by Monroe Brothers & Co., shoe-dealers, Lehman & Bolton, lithographers. William H. Butler, lithographer. The Crosscup & West Engraving Company extending on the west to the building formerly occupied by the Fourth National Bank and tax receiver's office, used by S. May, millinery straw-goods, Julius Gerstler, artificial flowers and feathers, Schoedler & Hilery, kid glove importers, and Weaver Electric Mail-Box Company on the east to the St. Cloud Hotel, kept by G. K. & G. H. Mullen, the upper stories of which were burned and all the furniture and contents damaged by fire and water; on the north dwelling-houses on Winfield place were overwhelmed by falling walls and partially burned. The flames crossed to the south side of Arch St. and burned the upper stories of No. 712, Fred. Gutekunst, photographer, No. 714, Fahy & Co., furs, No. 716, p. P. C. Fulweiler, tobacco and cigars, No. 718, George S. Harris, printing, 720, Gillender & Son, glassware, No. 722, Hunter & Brother, laces, Nos. 724-726 Custer & Son, millinery, with injury to adjoining properties on the west. Total loss, estimated, $500,000.
  • February 9. New building of First Unitarian Church, Chestnut St. east of Twenty-second, dedicated.
  • February 14. Brick dwelling-house No. 1225 Lawrence St. fell to the ground and totally destroyed; eleven persons in it at the time injured and bruised by the falling walls, joists and floors.
  • February 16. Fire at Nos. 613 and 615 Cherry St. which also damaged Nos. 611 and 617. Loss, $28,000.
  • March 3. Fire at the stable of People's Passenger R. W. Company, at Eight and Dauphin Sts. Loss, $5,000. It contained 128 horses, which were rescued.
  • March 20. Steam ferry-boat Cooper's Point, owned by the Camden and Atlantic R. R. Company, burned at her dock, Camden, and passenger-cars near by damaged. Loss, $24,000. Daniel Coyle, electrical engineer in employ of the Northern Electric Light Company, instantly killed at No. 1116 N. Second St. while readjusting a light, by the full current of electricity being turned on.
  • March 27. Hand type-setting contest at Dime Museum, Ninth and Arch Sts., which continued for 11 days and 3 hours. First prize won by Alexander Duguid, for the Cincinnati Enquirer, total, 69,200-1/4 ems. Other contestants were Joseph McCann, New York Herald, 68,907-1/2; W. C. Barnes, New York World, 655,714-1/4; Thomas Levy, Chicago Herald, 61,299-1/4; Peter Thienes, Philadelphia Times, 59,498; J. A. Washington, Philadelphia Inquirer, 53,289-1/2; James J. Nolan, Philadelphia North American, 52,575-1/2; W. A. Crane, Philadelphia Evening News, 447,434-1/4.
  • April 2. The traction company withdrew the night cars running on the Richmond, Columbia Ave., Seventeenth and Nineteenth Sts., and Chestnut and Walnut Sts. branches.
  • April 8. Fire at the Academy of Fine Arts, Broad and Cherry Sts. Forty paintings burned, among them St. Sebastian, by Murillo. Loss to the academy and artists, estimated, $70,000.
  • April 14. New line of night-cars commenced, on the Hestonville, Mantua and Fairmount (Arch St.) Railway from Second and Arch Sts. to Forty-third St. and Lancaster Ave. Night-cars resumed running on the railways formerly furnished, with that service by the traction company.
  • April 18. St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Seventh St. And Montgomery Ave., consecrated. New building of Second Reformed Presbyterian Church, Seventeenth St. below Race, formally opened.
  • April 21. Iron steamboat Newburgh, intended for passenger service on the North River, launched from the shipyard of Neafie & Levy, Kensington. Length, 245 feet; beam, 43 feet; depth of hold, 15 feet; engines, 1100 horse-power; burden, 1000 tons.
  • April 23. Spinning-mill of J. Meadowcraft & Sons, Emerald and Sergeant Sts., burned. Loss, $29,000.
  • May 3. East Baptist Church, Hanover St. below Thompson, dedicated.
  • May 6. New Northwestern National Bank opened for business at No. 1812 Girard Ave.
  • May 8. Steamboat John S. Ide, of Bridgeton and Philadelphia Line, sank at the mouth of Cohansey Creek.
  • May 9. St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, Fourth St. And Willing's Alley, remodeled, rebuilt and improved, formally re-opened.
  • May 11. The first train, carrying the president and other officers of the Baltimore to Ohio Railroad, passed over the railroad from Baltimore to the western abutment of the new bridge, below Gray's Ferry.
  • May 12. The Hayes Mechanics' Home, established under the will of George Hayes, who died in 1857, was formally opened on Belmont Ave. Near Christ Church Hospital.
  • May 24. Fire at paint and chemical works of Harrison Bros. & Co., Gary's Ferry Road. Loss, $60,000.
  • June 6. Basement of St. Stephen's Roman Catholic Church, Broad and Butler Sts., dedicated.
  • June 10. Formal opening of the new grounds of Belmont Cricket Club, at Forty-ninth St. Station, Pennsylvania R. R. Fire at the J. & P. Baltz brewery, Thompson St. above Thirty-first. Loss, $5,000.
  • June 11. Cornerstone laid of the parish building of St. Barnabas Protestant Episcopal Church, Third and Dauphin Sts.
  • June 21 Fire at George Smith's scroll and carpenter mill, Philadelphia St. between York and Dauphin. Loss, $10,000.
  • June 22. The four-oared shell of the College Club of the University of Pennsylvania rowed over the course on the Schuylkill River, and won the Childs cup, there being no competitors.
  • June 24. Cornerstone laid of the new house of the Bicycle Club, at Twenty-sixth and Perot Sts.
  • June 25. Iron steamship El Monte, built for the Morgan Line, between New York and New Orleans, launched from the yard of Cramps' Shipbuilding Company. Length, 338 feet; beam, 42 feet 8 inches; depth of hold, 31 feet 8 inches; carrying capacity, 9,000 bales of cotton; engines, 2500 horse-power.
  • June 26. Annual regatta of the Schuylkill navy, National course, 1-1/2 miles straightaway. Twenty entries. Prizes: Junior singles, Pennsylvania Club, 11m. 28-1/2s.; senior singles, Malta, 11m 57-1/2s.; junior four-oared gigs, Iona, 10 m. 1-1/2s.; double sculls, 10 m. 32-1/2s.; four-oared shells, Undine, 9m. 11-1/2s.; senior gigs, Iona, 9m. 21s.; pair-oared shells, Undine, 10m. 13s.; eight-oared shells, Malta, 8m. 11-1/2s.; being 43-1/2s. faster than the best record heretofore made, that by the Dauntless in 1880. Commodore's prize, single paper shell, to the Malta Club, for the most entries, crews coming in not more than 40s. behind the winning boat.
  • June 28. Fire at warehouse and factory, Northeast cor. Oxford and Randolph Sts., occupied by C. W. Hall, chair manufacturer, and B. F. Richardson, furniture manufacturer. Loss, $11,500.
  • June 30. Defalcation discovered in the accounts of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, amounting to $652,200.60; of this sum, $615,260 was an over issue of bonds of the company. J. L. Wilson, treasurer and secretary, and Henry V. Lesley, charged with being the guilty parties, absconded.
  • July 1. New Produce National Bank opened for business at No. 104 Chestnut St. The Casino, formally Lauber's Garden, Broad St. Above Columbia Ave., opened for the production of light operas with the "Crimson Scarf," by Legroix, and the "Cantrabandista," by Sir Arthur Sullivan.
  • July 5. Fairmount Park lighted with electric light for the first time, ten double-arc lights being placed on the Lemon Hill Observatory, 225 feet above the ground.
  • July 7. Ground broken for the new Park Avenue M. E. Church, at Park Ave. snd Norris St. New bridge of the East Side Schuylkill (B. and O.) R. R. Company across the Schuylkill at Gray's Ferry finished and put in use.
  • July 10. Cornerstone laid of new building of East Montgomery Ave. M. E. Church, Montgomery Ave. and Frankford Road.
  • July 13. Fire at packing-box factory and saw-mill of Tunis Manufacturing Company, Otsego and Moore Sts. Loss, $10,000. Eight-oared boat-race for the Childs Challenge cup, on the National course, Schuylkill River, 1-1/2 miles. Two entries. Won by the Malta Boat Club by two Lengths; time 8m. 6-1/2s.
  • July 19. Southwestern National Bank (new) opened for business, on Broad St. above South.
  • July 23. Southern section of Long Beach R. R. to Beach Haven, N.J., formally opened by Pennsylvania R. R. Company.
  • July 31. Samuel R. Shaw was struck by a stone while on a boat near Pine St. Wharf, Delaware River, knocked overboard and drowned. John, Timothy and Richard McLaughlin, George Flynn and Thomas, all boys, were held to answer and John Hillard as accessory
  • August 2. Swimming match for the championship of America, in on the Delaware River, between Dennis F. Butler, American champion, and W.B. Johnson, champion of England. Course, from off Cooper's Point to Ridgeway Park, 1 mile. Won by Butler in 15m 45s.
  • August 5. Second champion swimming-race on Delaware River between Butler and Johnson; 3 miles. Won by Butler in 45m.
  • August 7. Fire at shoe factory of John Mundell & Son, cor. Thirteenth and Cherry Sts. Loss $10,000.
  • August 14. Third and last swimming match on Delaware for championship of America between Butler and Johnson. Won by Butler. Course 5 miles; time 1h. 12m. 55s. New Columbia Theatre opened in rink building, formerly Ridge Avenue P. R. W. depot, N.E. cor. Twenty-third St. and Columbia Ave.
  • August 16. Baltimore and Ohio R. R. Company open depots for reception of freight for transmission to all points at Pier 35-1/2 N., at Brown St.; Pier 24 S., foot of Lombard St., and Piers 62 and 63 S., at Dickinson St., on the Delaware river.
  • August 28. Steamship Cherokee launched from the shipyard of William Cramp & Sons, built for William P. Clyde & Co. Length, 290 feet; beam, 43 feet; depth, 29 feet; measurement, 2500 tons.
  • August 29. Cornerstone laid of Cayuga Presbyterian Chapel, Sixteenth St. below Cayuga.
  • September 8. The assessors of the different wards made returns of the number of voters in the election divisions of the city as 229,092 an increase of 8,510 over last year.
  • September 16. First regular passenger-train over the Schuylkill River East Side (B. and O.) R. R. left station Twenty-third and Chestnut Sts., for Baltimore.
  • September 17. Wholesale grocery store and warehouse of Thompson Fry & Co., No. 131 Market St., destroyed by fire. Confectionery manufactory and store of Knight & Horebach, adjoining, wool-house of Coates Brothers and hardware stock of Robers, Duer & Miller, damaged by fire. Loss, $100,000. Fire at the bonded Warehouse of Fitzpatrick & Pemberton, at Front and Lombard Sts.; Section A, at the Corner of Lombard St., entirely destroyed. Loss, estimated, $50,000.
  • September 18. Ground broken for the new Third Regiment Armory, east side Broad St. above Wharton.
  • September 21. Fire at No. 25 N. Seventh St., occupied by Buchanan Smedley & Bromley, dealers in photographic materials, Davis Brothers, printers, D. W. Odiorne, umbrella materials, and Enterprise dining-rooms. Loss $25,000.
  • September 23. First international cricket match, at Nicetown Park, between Gentlemen of England, and Gentlemen of Philadelphia. Score, Philadelphia, first inning, 168; second inning, 70 total, 238, England, first and only inning, 323.
  • September 24, New temple of the Jewish congregation, Adath Jeshurun, Seventh St. above Columbia Ave., consecrated.
  • September 25. Cornerstone laid of the new building of Park Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, cor. Park Ave. and Norris St. Iron Steamship Seminole launched from the yard of William Cramp & Sons, ship and engine builders; vessel built for William P. Clyde & Co. Length, 290 feet; beam, 43 feet; depth, 29 feet, measurement, 2500 tons.
  • September 28. Planning and sash-mill of Gotlieb Hoersch, American St. above York, burned. Loss $16,000.
  • September 30. Windsor Theatre, Vine St. below Eighth, opened for the first time by Mahn's opera Company, with "Olivette."
  • October 3. Fire at the terra-cotta works of Harvey, Moland & Co., Seventh and York Sts. Loss $27,5000.
  • October 4. New Fourth Street National Bank, capital $1,500,000 commenced business on the east side of Fourth St. below Chestnut. Second international cricket match at Nicetown Park, between Gentlemen of England and Gentlemen of Philadelphia. Score: Philadelphia, first inning, 128; second inning, 146, total, 274. England, first inning, 235; second inning, 40 for four wickets, total, 275.
  • October 6. Fire in the finishing department of the shovel-works of T. Rowland's Sons, on Tacony Creek. Loss $20,000.
  • October 9. Cornerstone laid of Presbyterian Church of the Evangel, Eightieth and Tasker Sts.
  • October 10. New building of Temple Baptist Church, Twenty-second and Tioga Sts., dedicated. Cable-cars commenced running on the Columbia Ave. branch of the Union Passenger Railway.
  • October 24. Fifth Reformed Church (Dutch Reformed), Otis St. near Cedar, dedicated.
  • October 25. Bronze statue of Schiller by Henry Manger, sculptor, formally unveiled in West Fairmont Park, near Horticultural Hall.
  • October 30. New Girard Avenue Farmers' market-house, Girard Ave. and Ninth St., opened for business.
  • November 1. New buildings of the Second National Bank of Frankford, Main St. below Unity, opened for business.
  • November 10. Fire at John Brombly & Sons' carpet-mills, Front and Jasper Sts. Loss, $10,000. Fire at Nos. 22, 24, 26, and 28 N. Front St. occupied by J. M. Sharpless & Co., and others. Loss, $65,000.
  • November 11. Explosion and fire at cigar-box factory of Henry H. Sheip & Co., Randolph St. above Columbia Ave. One woman killed; fourteen persons burned and injured. Cornerstone laid on grounds of German Hospital of the Mary J. Drexel Home, for old men and women, Mother House for Deaconesses and Nurse-training School, the gift of John D. Lankenau.
  • November 25. Fire at furniture factory of John D. Raggio, Fourth and Reed Sts. Loss $75,000.
  • November 28. New building of Beacon Presbyterian Church, Cumberland and Cedar Sts., dedicated.
  • December 3. Fire at factory-building, Callowhill St. above Twelfth, occupied by Philadelphia Drop Forge Company and F. A. Wheeler & Co., straw-board linings. Loss $10,500..
  • December 4. Old Post-office building, Chestnut above Fourth, sold at auction to A. J. Drexel for 413,000.
  • December 11. Steamship Herman Winters, for the Metropolitan Steamship Company of New York, launched from the shipyard of William Cramp & Sons. Length, 286 feet, breadth of beam, 41-1/2 feet; depth of hold, 29 feet; burden, 2500 tons.
  • December 15. New tunnel of the Baltimore and Ohio R.R. on Twenty-fifth St. from Callowhill St. to the Reading Railroad, opened for the passage of freight trains.
  • December 16. Fire in mill-building at Coral and Dreer Sts., occupied by H. Davenport & Co. and Davenport & Hepworth, manufacturers of curtains and upholstery goods. Loss, $19,000.
  • December 17. Dye-house of J. G. Haley, Gorgas Lane, Roxboro, burned. Loss, $20,000.
  • December 20. A portion of Pier No. 54 S. Wharves, occupied by the Pennsylvania R.R. Company and the American and Red Star Steamship Lines, gave way, and sank into the Delaware, carrying down merchandise, etc. Loss, $50,000.
  • December 21. No. 711 Market St., occupied by Kneedler, Patterson & Co., drygoods, and John M. Maris & Co., druggists' supplies, destroyed by fire. Loss, $150,000.
  • December 25. Seventy-two hours' walking-match, go-as-you-please at the Elite Rink, Twenty-third and Chestnut Sts., closed. Won by Strokel, 386 miles 3 laps, being 14 miles 3 laps beyond any competitor.
  • December 27. Temple Theater and Egyptian Musee, old Masonic Hall building, under management of George C. Brotherton, totally destroyed by fire, together with the stores and salesrooms, in the first story, of Fairbanks & Co., scale-manufacturers, Remington Typewriter Co. and the Niles Tool Company. Losses also by Hubbard Bros., publishers and paper-manufacturers, 723 Chestnut St., and at the Washington Hotel, with partial damage to adjoining property. Loss estimated at $450,00. Two firemen killed and one injured by the falling walls.
  • December 31. Fire in spinning-room of Roxborough cotton and woolen-mill of J. Leech & Brother, Shur's Lane below Pechin St. Loss, $12,000.
  • Market-sheds and stalls on Girard Ave. between Sixth and Twelfth Sts. sold at auction preparatory to the abandonment of the public markets there.
  • January 3. Fire at J. R. Applegate's photograph gallery, Eighth and Vine SSTs. Loss, 5,000.
  • January 7. Fire at the office of the Evening Telegraph newspaper, at Nos. 106 and 108 S. Third St., C. E. Warburton, proprietor, which also damaged the office of Howard Gell & Co., brokers, No. 110, and of MacDonald & Conrad, grain-merchants, No. 106. Loss, $30,000.
  • January 9. Explosion — supposed of dynamite — in a shanty at Thirteenth and Stiles Sts. Building totally destroyed and a watchman killed. The report was heard as far north as Chestnut Hill and the shock felt at Burlington and Princeton, NJ. Houses on Girard Ave. and from Twenty-eighth to Thirty-first St., and in intersecting streets, suffered by breakage of sashes and window-panes.
  • January 10. New Lyceum Theatre, Vine St. below Eighth, formerly Miller's Varieties, rebuilt and improved, reopened with the play of Jack Cade by Collier's company.
  • January 11. Ninth National Bank opened for business at its new building, Front and Norris Sts.
  • January 12. The examiner and master to whom had been referred the equity suit arising in consequence of the failure of the Shackamaxon Gank filed his report, deciding that the amount; lost by the bank was $430,210,.29, and the defendants, Thomas L. Huggard, cashier of the bank, and Samuel P. Milligan, teller, were chargeable with the whole amount; also that Joseph Concklin was liable for $149,538.23, the estate of William Bumm, deceased, $285,823.42; G. W. and W. H. Bumm, surviving partners, $136,285.13, and G. W. and W. H. Bumm, new partners, $4,720.39.

Fire at curled-hair and glue factory of Delany & Co., Hancock and Jefferson Streets. Loss, $12,000.